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THE DISSOLUTION OF THE MONASTERIES BY KING HENRY VIII AND ITS EFFECT ON THE ECONMOY, POLITICAL LANDSCAPE, AND SOCIAL INSTABILITY IN TUDOR ENGLAND THAT LED TO THE CREATION OF THE POOR LAWS

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
Before the reformation and the schism of the Catholic Church, it had always been the duty of the Church and not of the state, to undertake the seven corporal works of mercy; feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, welcome the stranger, clothe the naked, visit the sick, visit the prisoner, and bury the dead. By dissolving these institutions, Henry had unwittingly created what would become a social disaster of biblical proportions. In essence, this act was rendering thousands of the poor and elderly without a home or shelter, it denied the country of much of the medical aid that has been offered by the church, it denied future generations of thousands of volumes of books and scriptures from the monastic libraries, as well as denied many an education who would have otherwise never received one without the help of the Church. The ultimate goal of my thesis is to prove my hypothesis that the dissolution of the monasteries by King Henry VIII was not merely a contributory factor in the need for the creation of poor laws, but the deciding factor (in a myriad of societal issues) for their creation.
Title: THE DISSOLUTION OF THE MONASTERIES BY KING HENRY VIII AND ITS EFFECT ON THE ECONMOY, POLITICAL LANDSCAPE, AND SOCIAL INSTABILITY IN TUDOR ENGLAND THAT LED TO THE CREATION OF THE POOR LAWS.
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Name(s): Cooper, Casey, Author
Bledsoe, Robert, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Before the reformation and the schism of the Catholic Church, it had always been the duty of the Church and not of the state, to undertake the seven corporal works of mercy; feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, welcome the stranger, clothe the naked, visit the sick, visit the prisoner, and bury the dead. By dissolving these institutions, Henry had unwittingly created what would become a social disaster of biblical proportions. In essence, this act was rendering thousands of the poor and elderly without a home or shelter, it denied the country of much of the medical aid that has been offered by the church, it denied future generations of thousands of volumes of books and scriptures from the monastic libraries, as well as denied many an education who would have otherwise never received one without the help of the Church. The ultimate goal of my thesis is to prove my hypothesis that the dissolution of the monasteries by King Henry VIII was not merely a contributory factor in the need for the creation of poor laws, but the deciding factor (in a myriad of societal issues) for their creation.
Identifier: CFH0003834 (IID), ucf:44770 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-05-01
B.A.
Sciences, Dept. of Political Science
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): King Henry VIII
Reformation
Protestant Reformation
Catholic Church
Dissolution
Monasteries
Tudor
Political
Poor Laws
Social Instability
England
Parliament
Anne Boleyn
Suppression
Church of England
Pope Clement
Pope
Rome
Vatican
Thomas More
Wolsey
Cadinal
Adultery
Mary Carey
Mary
Katherine of Aragon
Edward
Martin Luther
Defense of the Seven Sacraments
Queen Elizabeth
Elizabeth
Elizabethan
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0003834
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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