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HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS' PERSPECTIVES ON MALE INVOLVEMENT IN THEIR SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH CARE NEEDS

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Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
Young men are at the greatest risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs) within the U.S. male populations, yet are the least likely to make a sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care visit. Clinical approaches in these areas that include the outreach to and the involvement of male partners of female patients can prove particularly useful in expanding SRH care to men and can also improve health outcomes for women who have sex with men. In this study I examined UCF's healthcare provider's approaches to educate and involve men (between the ages of 18 and 30) and male partners of female patients in their SRH needs. I conducted qualitative semi-structured interviews with 18 health care providers at the Student Health Center; including physicians, physician assistants, and registered nurses. This study found that there were significant differences in perception of men's SRH risk behaviors among the providers. In addition, this study revealed issues that might deter male students from accessing care, specifically how patients are required to state to the operator (who is also an undergraduate student) their name, PID and exactly why they are scheduling a visit to the clinic, thus many men say they have cold symptoms instead of issues with SRH. This study is significant because it can contribute to improvements in the delivery of SRH care to male students on campus.
Title: HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS' PERSPECTIVES ON MALE INVOLVEMENT IN THEIR SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH CARE NEEDS.
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Name(s): Milanes, Lilian, Author
Mishtal, Joanna, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Young men are at the greatest risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs) within the U.S. male populations, yet are the least likely to make a sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care visit. Clinical approaches in these areas that include the outreach to and the involvement of male partners of female patients can prove particularly useful in expanding SRH care to men and can also improve health outcomes for women who have sex with men. In this study I examined UCF's healthcare provider's approaches to educate and involve men (between the ages of 18 and 30) and male partners of female patients in their SRH needs. I conducted qualitative semi-structured interviews with 18 health care providers at the Student Health Center; including physicians, physician assistants, and registered nurses. This study found that there were significant differences in perception of men's SRH risk behaviors among the providers. In addition, this study revealed issues that might deter male students from accessing care, specifically how patients are required to state to the operator (who is also an undergraduate student) their name, PID and exactly why they are scheduling a visit to the clinic, thus many men say they have cold symptoms instead of issues with SRH. This study is significant because it can contribute to improvements in the delivery of SRH care to male students on campus.
Identifier: CFH0004225 (IID), ucf:44954 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-05-01
B.S.
Sciences, Dept. of Anthropology
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): sexual and reproductive health
men
health care providers
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004225
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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