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INTERNET ADVERTISING: ARE WE BREAKING GROUND OR MOVING DIRT?

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Date Issued:
2005
Abstract/Description:
Seeking to validate the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) of Persuasion for the online advertising context, a laboratory experiment utilizing 240 undergraduates was conducted at a southeastern university. The quality of banner advertisement contents--product endorser (spokesperson) and arguments (headlines)--were manipulated testing the variables' effect on click-through and attitude toward the advertisement for groups with high and low levels of product category involvement. Exploring a replica of a popular music website, participants were exposed to the test banners on the site's homepage. Due to the limited number of click-throughs, the relationship between the independent variables and click-through could not be established. However, as hypothesized for the low involvement condition, source liking predicted participants' attitude toward the banner advertisements. In the high involvement condition, neither source liking nor argument strength was associated with attitude. Because the test product category--sport drinks--skewed low involvement, a follow-up study should select a high involvement product category to explore such condition more effectively.
Title: INTERNET ADVERTISING: ARE WE BREAKING GROUND OR MOVING DIRT?.
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Name(s): Marshall, Jaime, Author
Collins, Steven , Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2005
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Seeking to validate the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) of Persuasion for the online advertising context, a laboratory experiment utilizing 240 undergraduates was conducted at a southeastern university. The quality of banner advertisement contents--product endorser (spokesperson) and arguments (headlines)--were manipulated testing the variables' effect on click-through and attitude toward the advertisement for groups with high and low levels of product category involvement. Exploring a replica of a popular music website, participants were exposed to the test banners on the site's homepage. Due to the limited number of click-throughs, the relationship between the independent variables and click-through could not be established. However, as hypothesized for the low involvement condition, source liking predicted participants' attitude toward the banner advertisements. In the high involvement condition, neither source liking nor argument strength was associated with attitude. Because the test product category--sport drinks--skewed low involvement, a follow-up study should select a high involvement product category to explore such condition more effectively.
Identifier: CFE0000406 (IID), ucf:46348 (fedora)
Note(s): 2005-05-01
M.A.
Arts and Sciences, Nicholson School of Communication
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Internet
Advertising
ELM
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000406
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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