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AN EXAMINATION OF THIRD-PERSON EFFECT IN THE CONTEXT OF CONTOVERSIAL PRODUCT ADVERTISING

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Date Issued:
2005
Abstract/Description:
This research seeks to determine if there is a third-person effect in the realm of controversial product advertising. A questionnaire was designed based on previous research and distributed to a convenience sample of college students at the University of Central Florida. Participants were asked to rate their perceived levels of personal offense to product categories as well as the expected levels of other groups of people. The results show that there is indeed a significant third-person effect recognized for all product categories except for racial extremist groups. A first-person effect was shown to be present for the category of racial extremist groups. This research also suggests that a concealed third-person effect may have been present in previous studies of this nature that obtained high levels of offense attributed to the self. Discussions of the findings, implications for marketers and advertisers, limitations to the study, as well as suggestions for future research are also posited.
Title: AN EXAMINATION OF THIRD-PERSON EFFECT IN THE CONTEXT OF CONTOVERSIAL PRODUCT ADVERTISING.
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Name(s): Jensen, Keith , Author
Collins, Steve, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2005
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This research seeks to determine if there is a third-person effect in the realm of controversial product advertising. A questionnaire was designed based on previous research and distributed to a convenience sample of college students at the University of Central Florida. Participants were asked to rate their perceived levels of personal offense to product categories as well as the expected levels of other groups of people. The results show that there is indeed a significant third-person effect recognized for all product categories except for racial extremist groups. A first-person effect was shown to be present for the category of racial extremist groups. This research also suggests that a concealed third-person effect may have been present in previous studies of this nature that obtained high levels of offense attributed to the self. Discussions of the findings, implications for marketers and advertisers, limitations to the study, as well as suggestions for future research are also posited.
Identifier: CFE0000494 (IID), ucf:46370 (fedora)
Note(s): 2005-05-01
M.A.
Arts and Sciences, Nicholson School of Communication
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Third-person effect
controversial product advertising
offensive advertising
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000494
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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