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PERCEPTIONS ON THE SOCIAL STATUS OF PAPIAMENTU IN CONTRAST TO ITS OFFICIAL SIGNIFICANCE IN ARUBA AND CURACAO

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Date Issued:
2010
Abstract/Description:
Many creole languages have been studied by linguists and anthropologists alike in order to gain a better understanding as to their formations and social status within their respective cultures. Theories such as the Language Bioprogram hypothesis created by Derek Bickerton researched explicitly the genesis of creoles, primarily the creoles in Guyana and HawaiÂÂ'i. Although many creole languages are the main vernaculars of many cultures, they are often seen as having a lower status than the official language, usually a European language. Papiamentu, a language spoken in Aruba, Curaçao, and Bonaire, has carried a prestige that many other creoles do not possess; it is spoken by everyone on the islands. There are no class divides that determine what, when, and where the language can be used. It is accepted by the majority on the islands and has gained the status as an official language in March 2003 in Aruba and in March 2007 in Curaçao and Bonaire. Although it encompasses this status, Papiamentu is still not accepted in every faction on the islands. It is not the language of instruction in the educational system and official government documentation is still written in Dutch. This research explored the issues of PapiamentuÂÂ's social status on the islands and has correlated it to its use in several sectors in Aruba and Curaçao. Primary research was carried in Aruba and Curaçao for six weeks. Interviews along with participant-observation tackled issues such as PapiamentuÂÂ's presence in education, how Papiamentu was used during childhood, Papiamentu in relation to other languages on the islands, and the use of Papiamentu within the media. This research was executed to acquire a better insight into the perceptions of PapiamentuÂÂ's social status and whether these perspectives have a profound effect on its usage.
Title: PERCEPTIONS ON THE SOCIAL STATUS OF PAPIAMENTU IN CONTRAST TO ITS OFFICIAL SIGNIFICANCE IN ARUBA AND CURACAO.
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Name(s): Wiel, Keisha, Author
Howard, Rosalyn, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2010
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Many creole languages have been studied by linguists and anthropologists alike in order to gain a better understanding as to their formations and social status within their respective cultures. Theories such as the Language Bioprogram hypothesis created by Derek Bickerton researched explicitly the genesis of creoles, primarily the creoles in Guyana and HawaiÂÂ'i. Although many creole languages are the main vernaculars of many cultures, they are often seen as having a lower status than the official language, usually a European language. Papiamentu, a language spoken in Aruba, Curaçao, and Bonaire, has carried a prestige that many other creoles do not possess; it is spoken by everyone on the islands. There are no class divides that determine what, when, and where the language can be used. It is accepted by the majority on the islands and has gained the status as an official language in March 2003 in Aruba and in March 2007 in Curaçao and Bonaire. Although it encompasses this status, Papiamentu is still not accepted in every faction on the islands. It is not the language of instruction in the educational system and official government documentation is still written in Dutch. This research explored the issues of PapiamentuÂÂ's social status on the islands and has correlated it to its use in several sectors in Aruba and Curaçao. Primary research was carried in Aruba and Curaçao for six weeks. Interviews along with participant-observation tackled issues such as PapiamentuÂÂ's presence in education, how Papiamentu was used during childhood, Papiamentu in relation to other languages on the islands, and the use of Papiamentu within the media. This research was executed to acquire a better insight into the perceptions of PapiamentuÂÂ's social status and whether these perspectives have a profound effect on its usage.
Identifier: CFE0003323 (IID), ucf:48471 (fedora)
Note(s): 2010-08-01
M.A.
Sciences, Department of Anthropology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Papiamentu
Aruba
Curacao
sociolinguistics
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0003323
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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