You are here

Imaging long-range orientational order in monolayers of amphiphilic molecules with scanning probe force microscope and liquid crystal optical amplification

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
Monolayers of amphiphilic molecules at interface provide a unique system for understanding the thermodynamic and rheological properties of quasi two-dimensional systems. They are also an excellent model accessible for studying cell membranes. The feature of long-range organization of molecular tilt azimuth in monolayers at the air/water interface is one of the most interesting findings over the past two decades, which leads to the formation rich and defined textures. By observing the changes in these textures, the transitions between tilted monolayer phases can be detected. We study the boojum and stripe textures formed in the liquid-condensed phase of pentadecanoic acid (PDA) monolayers at the air/water interface and find that they can be preserved after being transferred to glass substrates at low dipping speeds at a temperature lower than the room temperature. Frictional force microscopy confirms the long-range tilt order in the transferred boojums and stripes of PDA, implying the interaction of the PDA molecules with the glass surface does not change the tilt order. Polymerized stripe textures of pentacosadiynoic acid (PCA) monolayers can also be transferred onto solid substrates. Atomic force microscopy shows that the PCA stripe textures represent the regular variations of molecular packing densities in PCA monolayers. Furthermore, we find that the molecular orientation and packing density changes in monolayers can induce the local order of nematic liquid crystals. Due to the long-range orientation correlation of nematic liquid crystals, the boojum and stripe textures in monolayers can be observed by an optical microscope after liquid crystal optical amplification.
Title: Imaging long-range orientational order in monolayers of amphiphilic molecules with scanning probe force microscope and liquid crystal optical amplification.
32 views
15 downloads
Name(s): Liang, Wenlang, Author
Fang, Jiyu, Committee Chair
Deng, Weiwei, Committee Member
An, Linan, Committee Member
Huo, Qun, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Monolayers of amphiphilic molecules at interface provide a unique system for understanding the thermodynamic and rheological properties of quasi two-dimensional systems. They are also an excellent model accessible for studying cell membranes. The feature of long-range organization of molecular tilt azimuth in monolayers at the air/water interface is one of the most interesting findings over the past two decades, which leads to the formation rich and defined textures. By observing the changes in these textures, the transitions between tilted monolayer phases can be detected. We study the boojum and stripe textures formed in the liquid-condensed phase of pentadecanoic acid (PDA) monolayers at the air/water interface and find that they can be preserved after being transferred to glass substrates at low dipping speeds at a temperature lower than the room temperature. Frictional force microscopy confirms the long-range tilt order in the transferred boojums and stripes of PDA, implying the interaction of the PDA molecules with the glass surface does not change the tilt order. Polymerized stripe textures of pentacosadiynoic acid (PCA) monolayers can also be transferred onto solid substrates. Atomic force microscopy shows that the PCA stripe textures represent the regular variations of molecular packing densities in PCA monolayers. Furthermore, we find that the molecular orientation and packing density changes in monolayers can induce the local order of nematic liquid crystals. Due to the long-range orientation correlation of nematic liquid crystals, the boojum and stripe textures in monolayers can be observed by an optical microscope after liquid crystal optical amplification.
Identifier: CFE0004498 (IID), ucf:49294 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-12-01
M.S.M.S.E.
Engineering and Computer Science, Materials Science Engineering
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): monolayer -- AFM -- 5CB -- 8CB
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004498
Restrictions on Access: campus 2013-06-15
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections