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For the Good That We Can Do: African Presses, Christian Rhetoric, and White Minority Rule in South Africa, 1899-1924

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Date Issued:
2017
Abstract/Description:
This research examines Christian rhetoric as a source of resistance to white minority rule in South Africa within African newspapers in the first two decades of the twentieth-century. Many of the African editors and writers for these papers were educated by evangelical protestant missionaries that arrived in South Africa during the nineteenth century. Most prior research on these presses has examined the importance of Christianity, but has not taken into account the evolution of its use over the entirety of the period. Without this emphasis on evolving utilization, the current scholarship lacks a complete understanding of African newspapers and their relationships with Christianity, the African population, and white minority rule. This research shows the importance of this evolution in the larger legacy of African resistance to marginalization in twentieth-century South Africa.
Title: For the Good That We Can Do: African Presses, Christian Rhetoric, and White Minority Rule in South Africa, 1899-1924.
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Name(s): Marsh, Ian, Author
Walker, Ezekiel, Committee Chair
Dandrow, Edward, Committee Member
Foster, Amy, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2017
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This research examines Christian rhetoric as a source of resistance to white minority rule in South Africa within African newspapers in the first two decades of the twentieth-century. Many of the African editors and writers for these papers were educated by evangelical protestant missionaries that arrived in South Africa during the nineteenth century. Most prior research on these presses has examined the importance of Christianity, but has not taken into account the evolution of its use over the entirety of the period. Without this emphasis on evolving utilization, the current scholarship lacks a complete understanding of African newspapers and their relationships with Christianity, the African population, and white minority rule. This research shows the importance of this evolution in the larger legacy of African resistance to marginalization in twentieth-century South Africa.
Identifier: CFE0006763 (IID), ucf:51849 (fedora)
Note(s): 2017-08-01
M.A.
Arts and Humanities, History
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): apartheid -- Christianity -- British Imperialism -- missionaries -- race -- resistance -- South Africa -- twentieth-century
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0006763
Restrictions on Access: public 2017-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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