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The microbial ecosystem of beer spoilage and souring: Competition and cooperation in the age of bioinformatics

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Date Issued:
2017
Abstract/Description:
The brewing industry generates $350 billion in revenue in the US annually, representing 1.9% of the gross domestic product. Spoilage is a persistent problem throughout production and distribution that causes economic loss, and is therefore meticulously avoided. Contrarily, artisanal sour beers are necessarily produced by a diverse variety of these spoilage organisms metabolically interacting in symbiosis as a microbial ecosystem. We sought to gain insight into factors driving assembly of microbial communities by testing a long-debated Darwinian hypothesis. A collection of community members were screened in co-culture and novel bioinformatics tools were developed to predict observed interactions. A fundamental understanding of these relationships is paramount to beer production and sets a precedent for the study of similar microbial communities that impact human health.
Title: The microbial ecosystem of beer spoilage and souring: Competition and cooperation in the age of bioinformatics.
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Name(s): Kettring, Andrew, Author
Moore, Sean, Committee Chair
Cole, Alexander, Committee Member
Self, William, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2017
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The brewing industry generates $350 billion in revenue in the US annually, representing 1.9% of the gross domestic product. Spoilage is a persistent problem throughout production and distribution that causes economic loss, and is therefore meticulously avoided. Contrarily, artisanal sour beers are necessarily produced by a diverse variety of these spoilage organisms metabolically interacting in symbiosis as a microbial ecosystem. We sought to gain insight into factors driving assembly of microbial communities by testing a long-debated Darwinian hypothesis. A collection of community members were screened in co-culture and novel bioinformatics tools were developed to predict observed interactions. A fundamental understanding of these relationships is paramount to beer production and sets a precedent for the study of similar microbial communities that impact human health.
Identifier: CFE0007288 (IID), ucf:52147 (fedora)
Note(s): 2017-12-01
M.S.
Medicine, Biomedical Sciences
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): microbial ecology -- bioinformatics -- brewing
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007288
Restrictions on Access: public 2018-06-15
Host Institution: UCF

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