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Preservice Teachers and Perceived Stress: A Comparative Study

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Date Issued:
2019
Abstract/Description:
Teachers are being pushed to the brink of burnout and leaving the profession, placing teachers' health and wellness in jeopardy (Daniels (&) Strauss, 2009; Maslach (&) Leiter, 2008; Stephenson, 2012; Vladut (&) Kallay, 2010; Wilkerson, 2009). Yet, it has become increasingly clear teacher stress may start prior to entering the profession (Brown (&) Ryan, 2003, Darling-Hammond, 2006). The researcher used a non-experimental design to evaluate the perceived stress among pre-service teachers enrolled in internship, and if the coping style of mindfulness had any correlation on self-reported stress levels. The quantitative study surveyed 332 student interns using the Perceived Stress Survey (Cohen (&) Williams, 1988) to depict perceived stress levels of pre-service teachers. A demographic questionnaire was also administered. The results indicated an increase in perceived stress, suggesting that stress may vary across the demographic variables of gender. Mindfulness was researched as a potential solution, however, there was no correlation between mindfulness and stress levels. education is necessary in the discussion and implementation of mindfulness as a potential intervention tool for stress. Further research is needed for a deeper understanding of gender, and how mindfulness may be a positive intervention to perceived stress.
Title: Preservice Teachers and Perceived Stress: A Comparative Study.
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Name(s): Evans, Kelsey, Author
Russell, William, Committee Chair
Hewitt, Randall, Committee Member
Hynes, Mike, Committee Member
Jahani, Shiva, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2019
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Teachers are being pushed to the brink of burnout and leaving the profession, placing teachers' health and wellness in jeopardy (Daniels (&) Strauss, 2009; Maslach (&) Leiter, 2008; Stephenson, 2012; Vladut (&) Kallay, 2010; Wilkerson, 2009). Yet, it has become increasingly clear teacher stress may start prior to entering the profession (Brown (&) Ryan, 2003, Darling-Hammond, 2006). The researcher used a non-experimental design to evaluate the perceived stress among pre-service teachers enrolled in internship, and if the coping style of mindfulness had any correlation on self-reported stress levels. The quantitative study surveyed 332 student interns using the Perceived Stress Survey (Cohen (&) Williams, 1988) to depict perceived stress levels of pre-service teachers. A demographic questionnaire was also administered. The results indicated an increase in perceived stress, suggesting that stress may vary across the demographic variables of gender. Mindfulness was researched as a potential solution, however, there was no correlation between mindfulness and stress levels. education is necessary in the discussion and implementation of mindfulness as a potential intervention tool for stress. Further research is needed for a deeper understanding of gender, and how mindfulness may be a positive intervention to perceived stress.
Identifier: CFE0007628 (IID), ucf:52546 (fedora)
Note(s): 2019-08-01
Ph.D.
Community Innovation and Education, School of Teacher Education
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Pre-Service Teachers -- Perceived Stress -- Mindfulness -- Self-Regulation -- Demographics
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007628
Restrictions on Access: public 2019-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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