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VARIABLE FLUID FLOW REGIMES ALTER ENDOTHELIAL ADHERENS JUNCTIONS AND TIGHT JUNCTIONS

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Date Issued:
2019
Abstract/Description:
Variable blood flow regimes influence a range of cellular properties ranging from cell orientation, shape, and permeability: all of which are dependent on endothelial cell-cell junctions. In fact, cell-cell junctions have shown to be an integral part of vascular homeostasis through the endothelium by allowing intercellular signaling and passage control through tight junctions (TJs), adherens junctions (AJs), and gap junctions (GJs). It was our objective to determine the structural response of both AJs and TJs under steady and oscillatory flow. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) were cultured in a parallel plate flow chamber and exposed to separate trails of steady and oscillatory fluid shear stress for 24 hours. Steady flow regimes consisted of a low laminar flow (LLF) of 1 dyne/cm2, and a high laminar flow (HLF) of 10 dyne/cm2 and oscillatory flow regimes consisted of low oscillatory flow (LOF) +/- 1 dyne/cm2 and high oscillatory flow (HLF) of +/- 10 dyne/cm2. We then imaged the TJs ZO-1 Claudin-5 and AJs JAM-A VE-Cadherin and subsequently analyzed their structural response as a function of pixel intensity. Our findings revealed an increase in pixel intensity between LLF and LOF along the boundary of the cells in both TJs ZO1 Claudin 5. Therefore, our results demonstrate the variable response of different cell-cell junctions under fluid shear, and for the first time, observes the difference in cell-cell junctional structure amongst steady and oscillatory flow regimes
Title: VARIABLE FLUID FLOW REGIMES ALTER ENDOTHELIAL ADHERENS JUNCTIONS AND TIGHT JUNCTIONS.
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Name(s): Ranadewa, Dilshan, Author
Steward, Robert, Committee Chair
Gou, Jihua, Committee CoChair
Mansy, Hansen, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2019
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Variable blood flow regimes influence a range of cellular properties ranging from cell orientation, shape, and permeability: all of which are dependent on endothelial cell-cell junctions. In fact, cell-cell junctions have shown to be an integral part of vascular homeostasis through the endothelium by allowing intercellular signaling and passage control through tight junctions (TJs), adherens junctions (AJs), and gap junctions (GJs). It was our objective to determine the structural response of both AJs and TJs under steady and oscillatory flow. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) were cultured in a parallel plate flow chamber and exposed to separate trails of steady and oscillatory fluid shear stress for 24 hours. Steady flow regimes consisted of a low laminar flow (LLF) of 1 dyne/cm2, and a high laminar flow (HLF) of 10 dyne/cm2 and oscillatory flow regimes consisted of low oscillatory flow (LOF) +/- 1 dyne/cm2 and high oscillatory flow (HLF) of +/- 10 dyne/cm2. We then imaged the TJs ZO-1 Claudin-5 and AJs JAM-A VE-Cadherin and subsequently analyzed their structural response as a function of pixel intensity. Our findings revealed an increase in pixel intensity between LLF and LOF along the boundary of the cells in both TJs ZO1 Claudin 5. Therefore, our results demonstrate the variable response of different cell-cell junctions under fluid shear, and for the first time, observes the difference in cell-cell junctional structure amongst steady and oscillatory flow regimes
Identifier: CFE0007518 (IID), ucf:52618 (fedora)
Note(s): 2019-05-01
M.S.M.E.
Engineering and Computer Science, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Endothelial Cell -- Cell-Cell Junctions -- Fluid Shear Force -- Tight Junctions -- Laminar Flow -- Oscillatory Flow -- Flow Regimes
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007518
Restrictions on Access: public 2019-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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