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INTERNATIONAL CONTRACTS: A QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF TRANSNATIONAL CONTRACT FORMATION

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
Globalization is the promise of the future, and it presents, quite literally, a world of opportunities not available in the past. International collaborations in science, research, and business now enjoy increased probabilities of success, in part, because of the advance in technology and the possibility of instantaneous communications. The convenience, simplicity and affordability of technology are helping to make the world accessible to almost everyone. With new availability of international concerns and the growth of global partnerships in all areas of interest, an increased need arises for agreements that memorialize collaborators' commitments, responsibilities and obligations. There is a corresponding concern that the agreements be enforceable across national and international lines should anything go wrong. There is no collaboration, partnership or venture that will not be touched in some way by the law. Whose law governs and how rules and regulations of different nations will be applied are of escalating concern. Empirically examining the state of international contract law is the overarching focus of my research. Adopting a research methodology involving both quantitative and qualitative techniques, I am investigating whether any consistency exists between attorneys of different practice sectors (academic, government, corporate and private) considering choice of law, enforcement of contract provisions, and the inclusion of preventative measures of international contracts. My results contribute to the future success of international collaborations of all concerns by empirically identifying the need for increased education on various dispute resolution options, as well as the effect cultural awareness has on the drafting of international contracts.
Title: INTERNATIONAL CONTRACTS: A QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF TRANSNATIONAL CONTRACT FORMATION.
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Name(s): Ackerman, David, Author
Browm, Cynthia, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Globalization is the promise of the future, and it presents, quite literally, a world of opportunities not available in the past. International collaborations in science, research, and business now enjoy increased probabilities of success, in part, because of the advance in technology and the possibility of instantaneous communications. The convenience, simplicity and affordability of technology are helping to make the world accessible to almost everyone. With new availability of international concerns and the growth of global partnerships in all areas of interest, an increased need arises for agreements that memorialize collaborators' commitments, responsibilities and obligations. There is a corresponding concern that the agreements be enforceable across national and international lines should anything go wrong. There is no collaboration, partnership or venture that will not be touched in some way by the law. Whose law governs and how rules and regulations of different nations will be applied are of escalating concern. Empirically examining the state of international contract law is the overarching focus of my research. Adopting a research methodology involving both quantitative and qualitative techniques, I am investigating whether any consistency exists between attorneys of different practice sectors (academic, government, corporate and private) considering choice of law, enforcement of contract provisions, and the inclusion of preventative measures of international contracts. My results contribute to the future success of international collaborations of all concerns by empirically identifying the need for increased education on various dispute resolution options, as well as the effect cultural awareness has on the drafting of international contracts.
Identifier: CFH0003845 (IID), ucf:44686 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-05-01
B.S.
Health and Public Affairs, Dept. of Legal Studies
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): International Contract
International Business
Survey
Empirical Legal Studies
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0003845
Restrictions on Access: campus 2012-04-01
Host Institution: UCF

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