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RELATIONSHIPS AMONG CHILD ABUSE EXPERIENCES, SOCIAL SUPPORT, AND ACADEMIC SUCCESS

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
Previous research indicated that childhood abuse experiences are important factors in determining the length and achievement of individuals' academic careers (Braver, Bumberry, Green, & Rawson, 1992). Several additional studies suggested that there is a relationship between childhood abuse experiences and social support (i.e., parental, peer, and teacher; Ezzell, Swenson, & Brondino, 2000; Goebbels, Nichols, Walsh, & De Vries, 2008). Although these relationships were documented, few studies examined the relationships between childhood abuse experiences, social support, and academic success in one comprehensive analysis. As a result, the current study examined the relationships among childhood abuse experiences, social support, and academic success. More specifically, the current study examined the mediational role of social support in the relationship between childhood abuse experiences and academic success. Participants completed four empirically validated questionnaires online. These questionnaires included a demographics questionnaire, the Student Perceived Availability of Social Support Questionnaire (SPASSQ; Vedder, Boekaerts, & Seegers, 2005), the Motivation to Achieve Academically Questionnaire (MAAQ; Waugh, 2002), and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ; Bernstein & Fink, 1998)). Using correlational analyses and regression analyses, results of the current study indicated that those individuals who reported childhood abuse experiences are more likely to have reported lower levels of parental support and that those who received a higher level of teachers' support are more likely to endorse academic success. Finally, childhood abuse experiences and social support generally were not significant predictors of academic success, and social support did not serve as a mediator in the relationship between childhood abuse experiences and academic success. Nonetheless, understanding the childhood experiences that individuals bring with them into their later lives still may be important in fostering the best possible academic outcomes.
Title: RELATIONSHIPS AMONG CHILD ABUSE EXPERIENCES, SOCIAL SUPPORT, AND ACADEMIC SUCCESS.
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Name(s): Havill, Amanda, Author
Renk, Kimberly, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Previous research indicated that childhood abuse experiences are important factors in determining the length and achievement of individuals' academic careers (Braver, Bumberry, Green, & Rawson, 1992). Several additional studies suggested that there is a relationship between childhood abuse experiences and social support (i.e., parental, peer, and teacher; Ezzell, Swenson, & Brondino, 2000; Goebbels, Nichols, Walsh, & De Vries, 2008). Although these relationships were documented, few studies examined the relationships between childhood abuse experiences, social support, and academic success in one comprehensive analysis. As a result, the current study examined the relationships among childhood abuse experiences, social support, and academic success. More specifically, the current study examined the mediational role of social support in the relationship between childhood abuse experiences and academic success. Participants completed four empirically validated questionnaires online. These questionnaires included a demographics questionnaire, the Student Perceived Availability of Social Support Questionnaire (SPASSQ; Vedder, Boekaerts, & Seegers, 2005), the Motivation to Achieve Academically Questionnaire (MAAQ; Waugh, 2002), and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ; Bernstein & Fink, 1998)). Using correlational analyses and regression analyses, results of the current study indicated that those individuals who reported childhood abuse experiences are more likely to have reported lower levels of parental support and that those who received a higher level of teachers' support are more likely to endorse academic success. Finally, childhood abuse experiences and social support generally were not significant predictors of academic success, and social support did not serve as a mediator in the relationship between childhood abuse experiences and academic success. Nonetheless, understanding the childhood experiences that individuals bring with them into their later lives still may be important in fostering the best possible academic outcomes.
Identifier: CFH0003786 (IID), ucf:44715 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-05-01
B.S.
Sciences, Department of Psychology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): child abuse
social support
academic success
mediational relationship
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0003786
Restrictions on Access: campus 2012-04-01
Host Institution: UCF

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