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MAN VS BEAST: THE HUMAN-ANIMAL BOUNDARY IN J. K. ROWLING'S HARRY POTTER SERIES

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
In her series of seven novels, Rowling constructs a society and a framework of characterization that allows her to explore the human-animal boundary in a variety of ways. She connects her novels to the ideology of the classical and medieval periods while still acknowledging the ways that the relationship between humans and animals has changed over the years by showcasing the influence of modern popular culture on her characterization of the human-animal boundary. Through her descriptions of werewolves, Patronuses, Animagi, and Harry Potter's and Lord Voldemort's abilities to speak Parseltongue, Rowling uses classical, medieval, and modern animal symbolism to showcase her characters' personalities. These human-animal frameworks associate particular imagery with each character, and this imagery highlights the core of the character. By using this symbolism to showcase her characters' deepest characteristics, Rowling also delineates her heroes and villains through their relationships with the boundary between humans and animals. This thesis analyzes the ways that Rowling's fusion of classical, medieval, and modern animal symbolism contributes to Rowling's characterization of heroes and villains throughout the series. By examining the instances where characters engage the human-animal boundary, this thesis constructs an argument that highlights the fluidity of the human-animal boundary through examples from the series and analysis of Rowling's characters.
Title: MAN VS BEAST: THE HUMAN-ANIMAL BOUNDARY IN J. K. ROWLING'S HARRY POTTER SERIES.
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Name(s): Auz, Jessica, Author
Pugh, Tison, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: In her series of seven novels, Rowling constructs a society and a framework of characterization that allows her to explore the human-animal boundary in a variety of ways. She connects her novels to the ideology of the classical and medieval periods while still acknowledging the ways that the relationship between humans and animals has changed over the years by showcasing the influence of modern popular culture on her characterization of the human-animal boundary. Through her descriptions of werewolves, Patronuses, Animagi, and Harry Potter's and Lord Voldemort's abilities to speak Parseltongue, Rowling uses classical, medieval, and modern animal symbolism to showcase her characters' personalities. These human-animal frameworks associate particular imagery with each character, and this imagery highlights the core of the character. By using this symbolism to showcase her characters' deepest characteristics, Rowling also delineates her heroes and villains through their relationships with the boundary between humans and animals. This thesis analyzes the ways that Rowling's fusion of classical, medieval, and modern animal symbolism contributes to Rowling's characterization of heroes and villains throughout the series. By examining the instances where characters engage the human-animal boundary, this thesis constructs an argument that highlights the fluidity of the human-animal boundary through examples from the series and analysis of Rowling's characters.
Identifier: CFH0003833 (IID), ucf:44717 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-05-01
B.A.
Arts and Humanities, Dept. of English
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Harry Potter
Animal Nature
Human Nature
Constructed Other
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0003833
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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