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DISCRIMINATION OF ARABS AND MUSLIMS IN SIMULATED HIRING DECISIONS: THE ROLE OF MULTIPLE CATEGORIZATION, PERCEIVED JOB FIT, AND SOCIAL DOMINANCE

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
Discrimination in hiring contexts has received a lot of attention from researchers in Industrial Organizational Psychology. However, discrimination against Arabs and Muslims in hiring contexts has been overlooked in the literature. The current study explores discrimination targeting Arabs and Muslims in the workplace. The theory of multiple categorization (Crisp & Hewstone, 1999) was applied to Arabs and Muslims in order to determine the relative effect of national origin and religious affiliation. Perceived job fit (Heilman, 1983) was also examined using an airport security position and a shipping and receiving clerk position. Participants rated mock resumes on several measures of hireability and ranked the applicants in the order in which they would hire them. The results show that the Muslim applicants were rated lower than the Christian applicants and the Arab applicants were rated lower than the Caucasian applicants. Furthermore, the Caucasian Christian applicant was rated significantly higher than the Caucasian Muslim applicant, the Arab Christian applicant, and the Arab Muslim applicant. This study shows that Arabs and Muslims were rated lower than their equally qualified counterparts, providing evidence of discrimination of Arabs and Muslims.
Title: DISCRIMINATION OF ARABS AND MUSLIMS IN SIMULATED HIRING DECISIONS: THE ROLE OF MULTIPLE CATEGORIZATION, PERCEIVED JOB FIT, AND SOCIAL DOMINANCE .
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Name(s): Dhanani, Lindsay, Author
Dipboye, Robert, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Discrimination in hiring contexts has received a lot of attention from researchers in Industrial Organizational Psychology. However, discrimination against Arabs and Muslims in hiring contexts has been overlooked in the literature. The current study explores discrimination targeting Arabs and Muslims in the workplace. The theory of multiple categorization (Crisp & Hewstone, 1999) was applied to Arabs and Muslims in order to determine the relative effect of national origin and religious affiliation. Perceived job fit (Heilman, 1983) was also examined using an airport security position and a shipping and receiving clerk position. Participants rated mock resumes on several measures of hireability and ranked the applicants in the order in which they would hire them. The results show that the Muslim applicants were rated lower than the Christian applicants and the Arab applicants were rated lower than the Caucasian applicants. Furthermore, the Caucasian Christian applicant was rated significantly higher than the Caucasian Muslim applicant, the Arab Christian applicant, and the Arab Muslim applicant. This study shows that Arabs and Muslims were rated lower than their equally qualified counterparts, providing evidence of discrimination of Arabs and Muslims.
Identifier: CFH0003802 (IID), ucf:44719 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-05-01
B.S.
Sciences, Dept. of Psychology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): discrimination
workplace
Arabs
Muslims
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0003802
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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