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EFFECTIVENESS OF NONPHARMACOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES FOR PROCEDURAL ANALGESIA IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
The purpose of this thesis is to provide a critical analysis of research findings about nonpharmacological techniques used independently of pharmacological techniques to prevent or reduce procedural pain for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A synthesis of the current research related to nonpharmacological pain relief techniques for infants was conducted for this thesis. Nonpharmacological interventions reviewed in this study include: Kangaroo Care, swaddling, facilitated tucking, positioning, music, non-nutritive sucking and sucrose. An interdisciplinary review of the research was performed using the interdisciplinary databases Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health, PubMED, and PsychINFO. Inclusion criteria for this thesis consists of research focused on preterm neonates (born < 37 weeks gestational age) in the neonatal intensive care unit, the use of nonpharmacological interventions for procedural analgesia, peer reviewed articles, and those written in the English language. This study excludes full term neonates due to the significant number of preterm neonates in the NICU. A total of 18 studies were included in this review. All interventions except for positioning show statistically significant evidence to support their use to reduce procedural pain in preterm neonates. Findings of this thesis may promote further studies and exploration into this field. In addition, this thesis establishes the role of the nurse in providing pain relief for infants in the NICU, as well as provide for enhancement of interdisciplinary care amongst other health care providers.
Title: EFFECTIVENESS OF NONPHARMACOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES FOR PROCEDURAL ANALGESIA IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT.
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Name(s): Flaherty, Lauren, Author
Allred, Kelly, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The purpose of this thesis is to provide a critical analysis of research findings about nonpharmacological techniques used independently of pharmacological techniques to prevent or reduce procedural pain for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A synthesis of the current research related to nonpharmacological pain relief techniques for infants was conducted for this thesis. Nonpharmacological interventions reviewed in this study include: Kangaroo Care, swaddling, facilitated tucking, positioning, music, non-nutritive sucking and sucrose. An interdisciplinary review of the research was performed using the interdisciplinary databases Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health, PubMED, and PsychINFO. Inclusion criteria for this thesis consists of research focused on preterm neonates (born < 37 weeks gestational age) in the neonatal intensive care unit, the use of nonpharmacological interventions for procedural analgesia, peer reviewed articles, and those written in the English language. This study excludes full term neonates due to the significant number of preterm neonates in the NICU. A total of 18 studies were included in this review. All interventions except for positioning show statistically significant evidence to support their use to reduce procedural pain in preterm neonates. Findings of this thesis may promote further studies and exploration into this field. In addition, this thesis establishes the role of the nurse in providing pain relief for infants in the NICU, as well as provide for enhancement of interdisciplinary care amongst other health care providers.
Identifier: CFH0003777 (IID), ucf:44739 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-05-01
B.S.N.
Nursing, College of Nursing
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Neonate
Pain
Procedure
Kangaroo Care
Swaddling
Sucrose
NICU
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0003777
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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