You are here

A COGNITIVE INVESTIGATION OF COMPUTERIZED WALK-THROUGH MODELS

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
The growth of the World Wide Web has prompted many businesses to develop electronic commerce (e-commerce) as a domain where consumers can conveniently purchase their products (Chittaro& Ranon, 2002). Marketing and Human - Computer Interaction (HCI) research has focused on the ways interactivity can improve purchasing experience. One particular technique is through the use of computer models of products known as visual object representations (Ozok& Komlodi, 2009). Research on visual product representations is focused on models of objects typically purchased in a store, such as clothing and electronics, which can usually be manipulated and rotated as desired (Ozok& Komlodi, 2009). There seems to be a gap in the literature regarding computer models for which consumers actually do not have an established mental models. Computerized walk-through models allow users to virtually navigate a space as well as to view a model of a living space from different orientations. An experiment was conducted on 100 participants to investigate computerized walk-through models and the role the type of model and workload plays in the amount of knowledge gained about the layout and consumer preference. Participants navigated a computerized walk-through model or a two dimensional picture set of a hotel room (low complexity) or apartment (high complexity) .Then they completed a series of surveys. Results indicate that two-dimensional models were best for learning the layout of a high complexity model and that three-dimensional models were better for learning the layout of a low complexity model. Results have implications for virtual model use in education and the military.
Title: A COGNITIVE INVESTIGATION OF COMPUTERIZED WALK-THROUGH MODELS.
19 views
8 downloads
Name(s): Carrillo, Maria, Author
Sims, Valerie, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The growth of the World Wide Web has prompted many businesses to develop electronic commerce (e-commerce) as a domain where consumers can conveniently purchase their products (Chittaro& Ranon, 2002). Marketing and Human - Computer Interaction (HCI) research has focused on the ways interactivity can improve purchasing experience. One particular technique is through the use of computer models of products known as visual object representations (Ozok& Komlodi, 2009). Research on visual product representations is focused on models of objects typically purchased in a store, such as clothing and electronics, which can usually be manipulated and rotated as desired (Ozok& Komlodi, 2009). There seems to be a gap in the literature regarding computer models for which consumers actually do not have an established mental models. Computerized walk-through models allow users to virtually navigate a space as well as to view a model of a living space from different orientations. An experiment was conducted on 100 participants to investigate computerized walk-through models and the role the type of model and workload plays in the amount of knowledge gained about the layout and consumer preference. Participants navigated a computerized walk-through model or a two dimensional picture set of a hotel room (low complexity) or apartment (high complexity) .Then they completed a series of surveys. Results indicate that two-dimensional models were best for learning the layout of a high complexity model and that three-dimensional models were better for learning the layout of a low complexity model. Results have implications for virtual model use in education and the military.
Identifier: CFH0004155 (IID), ucf:44841 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-05-01
B.S.
Sciences, Dept. of Psychology
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): virtual environments
cognitive psychology
marketing
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004155
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections