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EXPLORING THE LINGUISTIC STYLES OF STUDENTS WITH A PROPENSITY FOR ALCOHOLISM AND STUDENTS WITH SYMPTOMS OF DEPRESSION

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
The present study investigated whether participants with a high propensity for alcoholism demonstrate the same linguistic pattern previously established for depression in response to a personal essay. It was hypothesized that students with a higher propensity for alcoholism would display a similar linguistic style when compared to those with symptoms of depression; specifically students with a higher propensity for alcohol abuse or dependence would use more first person singular pronouns and less first person plural pronouns. They were also hypothesized to use more negative emotion words similar to those with symptoms of depression. Participants completed a writing exercise that was analyzed using the Linguistic Inquiry Word Count software (Pennebaker, Booth, & Francis, 2007). The data was analyzed using Pearson Bivariate Correlations. The participants completed a writing exercise, the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, the Beck Depression Inventory, Marlowe-Crowne Short Form, and a short demographic survey, respectively. The correlation between s propensity for alcoholism and symptoms of depression was not significant and the linguistic patterns varied substantially from the hypotheses. Even though the hypotheses were not supported, there were significant correlations between propensity for alcoholism and linguistic choices. The potential for linguistic analysis to be developed into an indirect assessment of alcohol dependence is discussed as a way to minimize the difficulties surrounding self-report methods.
Title: EXPLORING THE LINGUISTIC STYLES OF STUDENTS WITH A PROPENSITY FOR ALCOHOLISM AND STUDENTS WITH SYMPTOMS OF DEPRESSION.
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Name(s): Sanders, Sarah, Author
Whitten, Shannon, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The present study investigated whether participants with a high propensity for alcoholism demonstrate the same linguistic pattern previously established for depression in response to a personal essay. It was hypothesized that students with a higher propensity for alcoholism would display a similar linguistic style when compared to those with symptoms of depression; specifically students with a higher propensity for alcohol abuse or dependence would use more first person singular pronouns and less first person plural pronouns. They were also hypothesized to use more negative emotion words similar to those with symptoms of depression. Participants completed a writing exercise that was analyzed using the Linguistic Inquiry Word Count software (Pennebaker, Booth, & Francis, 2007). The data was analyzed using Pearson Bivariate Correlations. The participants completed a writing exercise, the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, the Beck Depression Inventory, Marlowe-Crowne Short Form, and a short demographic survey, respectively. The correlation between s propensity for alcoholism and symptoms of depression was not significant and the linguistic patterns varied substantially from the hypotheses. Even though the hypotheses were not supported, there were significant correlations between propensity for alcoholism and linguistic choices. The potential for linguistic analysis to be developed into an indirect assessment of alcohol dependence is discussed as a way to minimize the difficulties surrounding self-report methods.
Identifier: CFH0004375 (IID), ucf:45007 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-05-01
B.S.
Sciences, Dept. of Psychology
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): language
alcohol abuse and dependence
LIWC
depression
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004375
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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