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SLEEPING, NAPPING AND STAYING UP: THE MEANINGS OF SLEEP AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
Throughout public discourse, sleep, despite being a physiological function and an important facet of an individual's health, is frequently utilized as a rhetorical device to comment on an individual's productivity within society. As Antje Richter (2003:34) explains, to consider someone early to rise yet late to bed is less a comment on their sleeping behavior and more an assessment of their dedication to their business. Too often productivity is conveyed as existing in the absence of sleep, an idea that has contributed to the association of sleep with laziness (Yi 2003:60) and a general misuse of time (Richter 2003:36). The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between sleep and personal perspectives of productivity within a college population. Utilizing in depth, ethnographic semi-structured interviews, and working with 25 college students from the University of Central Florida, it was found that the standards and expectations students have internalized regarding their productivity are influencing the way in which they are practicing in their daily sleeping behaviors and ultimately influencing the amount of sleep they get each night.
Title: SLEEPING, NAPPING AND STAYING UP: THE MEANINGS OF SLEEP AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS.
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Name(s): Tate, Natasha, Author
Mishtal, Joanna, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Throughout public discourse, sleep, despite being a physiological function and an important facet of an individual's health, is frequently utilized as a rhetorical device to comment on an individual's productivity within society. As Antje Richter (2003:34) explains, to consider someone early to rise yet late to bed is less a comment on their sleeping behavior and more an assessment of their dedication to their business. Too often productivity is conveyed as existing in the absence of sleep, an idea that has contributed to the association of sleep with laziness (Yi 2003:60) and a general misuse of time (Richter 2003:36). The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between sleep and personal perspectives of productivity within a college population. Utilizing in depth, ethnographic semi-structured interviews, and working with 25 college students from the University of Central Florida, it was found that the standards and expectations students have internalized regarding their productivity are influencing the way in which they are practicing in their daily sleeping behaviors and ultimately influencing the amount of sleep they get each night.
Identifier: CFH0004383 (IID), ucf:45025 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-05-01
B.A.
Sciences, Dept. of Anthropology
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Sleep
Napping
Anthropology of Sleep
collegiate sleep
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004383
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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