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THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN MATERNAL RESILIENCY, PERCEPTIONS OF TOUCH, AND REPORTS OF INFANT TOUCH

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
The purpose of this research study is to measure how mothers perceive and use touch with their infants, and its association with maternal resiliency, a measure of coping ability. This is important because the inability to cope causes increased stress, which increases negative perceptions of life events, making it even more difficult to cope. In addition, research has yet to uncover whether or not resiliency is increased in mothers by the same touch and interactions that has been proven to enhance development, attachment, and resiliency in infants. This study involved asking participants (mothers of infants <1 year of age) to complete demographic information and a survey composed of three questionnaires: the Mother-Infant Touch Survey, the Physical Contact Assessment, and the Resilience Scale. Although there were no statistically significant correlations between reported perceptions of touch, mother-infant touch and maternal resiliency, there were a couple of other findings that warrant further investigation. Hispanic mothers scored higher on the Resiliency Scale (RS-14) than Non-Hispanic mothers, and a linear trend was detected between mothers in the < 25 years of age group and higher scores on the RS-14. These findings may influence future research on the correlations between mother-infant touch and maternal coping ability.
Title: THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN MATERNAL RESILIENCY, PERCEPTIONS OF TOUCH, AND REPORTS OF INFANT TOUCH.
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Name(s): D'Agostino, Lisa, Author
Waldrop, Julee, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The purpose of this research study is to measure how mothers perceive and use touch with their infants, and its association with maternal resiliency, a measure of coping ability. This is important because the inability to cope causes increased stress, which increases negative perceptions of life events, making it even more difficult to cope. In addition, research has yet to uncover whether or not resiliency is increased in mothers by the same touch and interactions that has been proven to enhance development, attachment, and resiliency in infants. This study involved asking participants (mothers of infants <1 year of age) to complete demographic information and a survey composed of three questionnaires: the Mother-Infant Touch Survey, the Physical Contact Assessment, and the Resilience Scale. Although there were no statistically significant correlations between reported perceptions of touch, mother-infant touch and maternal resiliency, there were a couple of other findings that warrant further investigation. Hispanic mothers scored higher on the Resiliency Scale (RS-14) than Non-Hispanic mothers, and a linear trend was detected between mothers in the < 25 years of age group and higher scores on the RS-14. These findings may influence future research on the correlations between mother-infant touch and maternal coping ability.
Identifier: CFH0004329 (IID), ucf:45032 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-05-01
B.S.N.
Nursing, College of Nursing
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): resilience
mother
baby
resiliency
touch
bonding
infant
mother-infant
perception
maternal
likert
resiliency scale
mother-infant touch survey
physical contact assessment
association
correlation
survey
study
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004329
Restrictions on Access: public 2013-04-01
Host Institution: UCF

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