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TEMPORARY BARRIERS REDUCE RUBBERNECKING AND EXTERNAL DISTRACTION ON ROADWAYS

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
The purpose of the current study was to empirically examine the effects of accident scenes on eye movement as well as driving behavior. Fifty-four participants drove in a driving simulator wearing a head-mounted eye-tracker in three experimental drives, one of which had an accident scene. The participants were put into one of three different conditions (no barrier, partial barrier, or full barrier). The results showed significant main effects of distraction (accident vs. no accident) on dwell frequency and duration, average speed, and root mean square error of the steering wheel angle during the drive with the accident scenes. In addition, the results also showed significant interaction effects between distraction and type of barrier (no, partial, or full) on dwell frequency and duration. The full barrier condition had the biggest effect on decreasing dwell duration and frequency. The findings support the Salience Effort Expectancy Value (SEEV) model of attention and previous research stating objects high in salience attract attention (Wickens & Horrey, 2008; Itti & Koch, 2000). These findings also support previous research by Mayer, Caird, Milloy, Percival, & Ohlhauser (2010) stating that drivers drive in the safest manner (lowest passing speed) when an emergency vehicles are present with the emergency lights on. Temporary barriers could be used to help decrease the effects of rubbernecking on highways when an accident scene is present (Masinick & Teng, 2004; Potts, Harwood, Hutton, & Kinzel, 2010)
Title: TEMPORARY BARRIERS REDUCE RUBBERNECKING AND EXTERNAL DISTRACTION ON ROADWAYS.
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Name(s): Colon, Nicholas, Author
Mouloua, Mustapha, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The purpose of the current study was to empirically examine the effects of accident scenes on eye movement as well as driving behavior. Fifty-four participants drove in a driving simulator wearing a head-mounted eye-tracker in three experimental drives, one of which had an accident scene. The participants were put into one of three different conditions (no barrier, partial barrier, or full barrier). The results showed significant main effects of distraction (accident vs. no accident) on dwell frequency and duration, average speed, and root mean square error of the steering wheel angle during the drive with the accident scenes. In addition, the results also showed significant interaction effects between distraction and type of barrier (no, partial, or full) on dwell frequency and duration. The full barrier condition had the biggest effect on decreasing dwell duration and frequency. The findings support the Salience Effort Expectancy Value (SEEV) model of attention and previous research stating objects high in salience attract attention (Wickens & Horrey, 2008; Itti & Koch, 2000). These findings also support previous research by Mayer, Caird, Milloy, Percival, & Ohlhauser (2010) stating that drivers drive in the safest manner (lowest passing speed) when an emergency vehicles are present with the emergency lights on. Temporary barriers could be used to help decrease the effects of rubbernecking on highways when an accident scene is present (Masinick & Teng, 2004; Potts, Harwood, Hutton, & Kinzel, 2010)
Identifier: CFH0004331 (IID), ucf:45059 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-05-01
B.S.
Sciences, Dept. of Psychology
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): driving
rubbernecking
external distraction
driver distraction
distraction
barrier
temporary barrier
roadway screens
screens
motorway screens
occlusion barriers
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004331
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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