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EXPECTANCY THEORY AND MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL PLAYER COMPENSATION

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
Major League Baseball (MLB) organizations spend millions of dollars each year on athletes with the end goal of winning a World Series title. However when an organization signs a player to a long term contract are they actually receiving the production that they paid for? Under the MLB's current form of player compensation players may not be properly motivated or at least not motivated to perform at their highest level. The intent of this thesis was to apply expectancy theory in assessing Major League Baseball's current form of player compensation. It evaluates how well players are currently motivated to perform on the field, and if any improvements can be made. This is done through the statistical analysis of MLB organizations yearly salary data, yearly win-loss record, and the performance of 65 players two years prior to, one year prior to, and during their first contract term directly following or extending past arbitration eligibility. Evidence shows that player motivation, especially for position players, can be increased and several suggestions are made as to how this can be improved and how MLB organizations can increase the odds of player production matching compensation.
Title: EXPECTANCY THEORY AND MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL PLAYER COMPENSATION.
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Name(s): Leonard, Edward, Author
Saunders, Carol, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Major League Baseball (MLB) organizations spend millions of dollars each year on athletes with the end goal of winning a World Series title. However when an organization signs a player to a long term contract are they actually receiving the production that they paid for? Under the MLB's current form of player compensation players may not be properly motivated or at least not motivated to perform at their highest level. The intent of this thesis was to apply expectancy theory in assessing Major League Baseball's current form of player compensation. It evaluates how well players are currently motivated to perform on the field, and if any improvements can be made. This is done through the statistical analysis of MLB organizations yearly salary data, yearly win-loss record, and the performance of 65 players two years prior to, one year prior to, and during their first contract term directly following or extending past arbitration eligibility. Evidence shows that player motivation, especially for position players, can be increased and several suggestions are made as to how this can be improved and how MLB organizations can increase the odds of player production matching compensation.
Identifier: CFH0004406 (IID), ucf:45091 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-05-01
B.S.B.A.
Business Administration, Dept. of Management
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): major league baseball
expectancy theory
compensation
motivation
pay
performance
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004406
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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