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"METHODS SHORT OF WAR": THE UNITED STATES REACTS TO THE RISE OF THE THIRD REICH

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
This project analyzes the various opinions in the United States of Adolf Hitler and the Nazis during the 1930s and studies the amount of information that was available in the United States regarding Nazi Germany before entering World War II. Specifically, it seeks to understand why the United States did relatively little to influence German and European affairs even in the face of increasing Nazi brutality and bellicosity. The analysis has been divided into three different categories. The first focuses on the United States government, and the President and Secretary of State in particular. The second category analyzes the minority opinion in the United States that had Nazi sympathies. Finally, the third deals with the American public in general. The evidence suggests that there was enough information regarding Nazi Germany for Americans to make a reasonable judgment. Most of the United States was opposed to Nazism and the German government. In spite of this, the majority agreed that the United States should not intervene or enter war. This study is significant because it helps shed further light on a debate in the country that continues to the present day: what role should the United States have when it comes to world affairs? The research in this thesis suggests that, in spite of opposition by the American public, if there is enough verifiable evidence of a humanitarian crisis to justify intervention, the government should act.
Title: "METHODS SHORT OF WAR": THE UNITED STATES REACTS TO THE RISE OF THE THIRD REICH.
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Name(s): Negy, Kenneth, Author
Crepeau, Richard, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This project analyzes the various opinions in the United States of Adolf Hitler and the Nazis during the 1930s and studies the amount of information that was available in the United States regarding Nazi Germany before entering World War II. Specifically, it seeks to understand why the United States did relatively little to influence German and European affairs even in the face of increasing Nazi brutality and bellicosity. The analysis has been divided into three different categories. The first focuses on the United States government, and the President and Secretary of State in particular. The second category analyzes the minority opinion in the United States that had Nazi sympathies. Finally, the third deals with the American public in general. The evidence suggests that there was enough information regarding Nazi Germany for Americans to make a reasonable judgment. Most of the United States was opposed to Nazism and the German government. In spite of this, the majority agreed that the United States should not intervene or enter war. This study is significant because it helps shed further light on a debate in the country that continues to the present day: what role should the United States have when it comes to world affairs? The research in this thesis suggests that, in spite of opposition by the American public, if there is enough verifiable evidence of a humanitarian crisis to justify intervention, the government should act.
Identifier: CFH0004415 (IID), ucf:45094 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-05-01
B.A.
Arts and Humanities, Dept. of History
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): United States
Nazism
Adolf Hitler
Germany
World War II
Franklin D. Roosevelt
FDR
Cordell Hull
Henry Ford
Charles Lindbergh
Father Charles Coughlin
Gallup Poll
New York Times
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004415
Restrictions on Access: campus 2014-04-01
Host Institution: UCF

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