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BARRIERS AFFECTING COMPLIANCE WITH THE IMPLEMENTATION OF EARLY GOAL DIRECTED THERAPY IN THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT.

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
Early Goal Directed Therapy (EGDT) has been thoroughly researched and clinically supported to be effective at lowering morbidity and mortality associated with severe sepsis and septic shock. Due to the strengths of its efficacy, it has been integrated as an essential component of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. However, very few studies have explored the barriers that affect compliance of the protocol in actual practice. The purpose of this study was to synthesize current research findings regarding nursing barriers associated with EGDT. This research was limited to studies performed in the United States between 2003-2012, with patients at least 18 years old, and with data obtained from studies conducted within emergency departments (EDs) only. These findings may serve to help increase the compliance rate with the protocol among nurses in the ED. Findings indicated that compliance rates were mostly affected by two major barriers: 1) Lack of knowledge regarding the presentation and management of sepsis and septic shock, and 2)Lack of resources in the ED to perform the protocol to its full potential. Limitations of the review noted were that most research studies used were in major academic hospitals which limited the generalizability of the findings to other hospital settings. Nursing education should emphasize early recognition and aggressive treatment of sepsis. Future research should focus on addressing the most efficient ways to educate nurses on sepsis presentation and management and the ways these can be implemented in practice.
Title: BARRIERS AFFECTING COMPLIANCE WITH THE IMPLEMENTATION OF EARLY GOAL DIRECTED THERAPY IN THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT.
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Name(s): Castro, Ivan, Author
Blackwell, Christopher, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Early Goal Directed Therapy (EGDT) has been thoroughly researched and clinically supported to be effective at lowering morbidity and mortality associated with severe sepsis and septic shock. Due to the strengths of its efficacy, it has been integrated as an essential component of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. However, very few studies have explored the barriers that affect compliance of the protocol in actual practice. The purpose of this study was to synthesize current research findings regarding nursing barriers associated with EGDT. This research was limited to studies performed in the United States between 2003-2012, with patients at least 18 years old, and with data obtained from studies conducted within emergency departments (EDs) only. These findings may serve to help increase the compliance rate with the protocol among nurses in the ED. Findings indicated that compliance rates were mostly affected by two major barriers: 1) Lack of knowledge regarding the presentation and management of sepsis and septic shock, and 2)Lack of resources in the ED to perform the protocol to its full potential. Limitations of the review noted were that most research studies used were in major academic hospitals which limited the generalizability of the findings to other hospital settings. Nursing education should emphasize early recognition and aggressive treatment of sepsis. Future research should focus on addressing the most efficient ways to educate nurses on sepsis presentation and management and the ways these can be implemented in practice.
Identifier: CFH0004420 (IID), ucf:45095 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-05-01
B.S.N.
Nursing, College of Nursing
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): EGDT
Early Goal Directed Therapy
Sepsis
Nursing
Barriers
Septic Shock
Emergency Department
ED
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004420
Restrictions on Access: public 2013-04-01
Host Institution: UCF

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