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THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG PREVIOUS EXPOSURE TO WAR AND CONFLICT, ACCULTURATION, AND IDENTITY FORMATION AMONG ADOLESCENT REFUGEES

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Date Issued:
2014
Abstract/Description:
This thesis examines the relationship among previous exposure to war and conflict, acculturation, and identity formation among adolescent refugees. It was hypothesized that US acculturation would mediate the association between exposure to war and conflict and identity development among adolescent refugees. Participants included 33 adolescent refugees (16 males and 17 females) ranging in age between 11 and 17 years (M = 14.61, SD = 1.48), who were recruited through a refugee resettlement service provider located in Orlando, Florida. Country of origin included Cuba (n = 25), Iraq (n = 4), Jordan (n =1), Haiti (n =1), Colombia (n =1), and Venezuela (n =1). Previous exposure to war and conflict was found to impact identity development; however, the proposed hypothesis in which US acculturation mediates the association between exposure to war and conflict on the one hand, and identity development on the other was not supported. Results indicated that US acculturation was not related to any of the study variables. Previous exposure to war and conflict, along with hardships caused by such experiences, were negatively correlated with identity development and positively correlated with identity distress. In addition, native acculturation was negatively correlated with identity distress, suggesting that acculturation to one's native culture may serve as a protective factor against identity distress among adolescent refugees. Implications for professional practice are discussed.
Title: THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG PREVIOUS EXPOSURE TO WAR AND CONFLICT, ACCULTURATION, AND IDENTITY FORMATION AMONG ADOLESCENT REFUGEES.
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Name(s): Guler, Jessy, Author
Berman, Steven, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This thesis examines the relationship among previous exposure to war and conflict, acculturation, and identity formation among adolescent refugees. It was hypothesized that US acculturation would mediate the association between exposure to war and conflict and identity development among adolescent refugees. Participants included 33 adolescent refugees (16 males and 17 females) ranging in age between 11 and 17 years (M = 14.61, SD = 1.48), who were recruited through a refugee resettlement service provider located in Orlando, Florida. Country of origin included Cuba (n = 25), Iraq (n = 4), Jordan (n =1), Haiti (n =1), Colombia (n =1), and Venezuela (n =1). Previous exposure to war and conflict was found to impact identity development; however, the proposed hypothesis in which US acculturation mediates the association between exposure to war and conflict on the one hand, and identity development on the other was not supported. Results indicated that US acculturation was not related to any of the study variables. Previous exposure to war and conflict, along with hardships caused by such experiences, were negatively correlated with identity development and positively correlated with identity distress. In addition, native acculturation was negatively correlated with identity distress, suggesting that acculturation to one's native culture may serve as a protective factor against identity distress among adolescent refugees. Implications for professional practice are discussed.
Identifier: CFH0004551 (IID), ucf:45186 (fedora)
Note(s): 2014-05-01
B.S.
Sciences, Dept. of Psychology
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Refugees
Adolescence
Identity Development
Acculturation
Identity Distress
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004551
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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