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DEPRESSION: AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH HIGH DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS AMONG THE LATINO IMMIGRANT POPULATION

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Date Issued:
2015
Abstract/Description:
Depression seems to affect a large portion of Americans living the U.S. Specifically, it has been found to affect the Latino population more so than other ethnicities. When considering Latino immigrants, it is important to take into consideration the additional challenges (e.g. adaptation, acculturation) that may lead to the development of depression. In the current study, the aim is to find a relationship between depression and other psychological constructs (e.g. dominant group and intragroup marginalization, acculturative stress) in order to determine high risk factors for depressive symptoms among Latino immigrants in the Florida community. 128 Latino immigrants (44 males, 81 females, 3 indicated no specific gender) residing in the Central Florida Community completed scales assessing Marginalization by non-Latinos, Marginalization by Latinos, Symptoms of Depression, and Social Support. Marginalization by Whites and by Latinos/as was not associated significantly with symptoms of depression (rs = .16 and -.02, ps > .05, respectively). In contrast, acculturative stress correlated significantly with symptoms of depression (r = .33, p < .01). It was also predicted that social support would mitigate the association between acculturative stress and symptoms of depression. To test this, I first established that social support correlated significantly with symptoms of depression (r = -.39, p < .001). Next, a partial correlation analysis was conducted to determine the relation between acculturative stress and symptoms of depression while partialing social support. The resulting correlation (r = .30, p < .01) suggested that social support did not account for the observed association between acculturative stress and symptoms of depression. From a clinical perspective, this research is beneficial in knowing what may contribute to depressive symptoms among a growing population, which could then create additional components to consider in treatments.
Title: DEPRESSION: AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH HIGH DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS AMONG THE LATINO IMMIGRANT POPULATION.
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Name(s): Altamirano, Elizabeth, Author
Negy, Charles, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Depression seems to affect a large portion of Americans living the U.S. Specifically, it has been found to affect the Latino population more so than other ethnicities. When considering Latino immigrants, it is important to take into consideration the additional challenges (e.g. adaptation, acculturation) that may lead to the development of depression. In the current study, the aim is to find a relationship between depression and other psychological constructs (e.g. dominant group and intragroup marginalization, acculturative stress) in order to determine high risk factors for depressive symptoms among Latino immigrants in the Florida community. 128 Latino immigrants (44 males, 81 females, 3 indicated no specific gender) residing in the Central Florida Community completed scales assessing Marginalization by non-Latinos, Marginalization by Latinos, Symptoms of Depression, and Social Support. Marginalization by Whites and by Latinos/as was not associated significantly with symptoms of depression (rs = .16 and -.02, ps > .05, respectively). In contrast, acculturative stress correlated significantly with symptoms of depression (r = .33, p < .01). It was also predicted that social support would mitigate the association between acculturative stress and symptoms of depression. To test this, I first established that social support correlated significantly with symptoms of depression (r = -.39, p < .001). Next, a partial correlation analysis was conducted to determine the relation between acculturative stress and symptoms of depression while partialing social support. The resulting correlation (r = .30, p < .01) suggested that social support did not account for the observed association between acculturative stress and symptoms of depression. From a clinical perspective, this research is beneficial in knowing what may contribute to depressive symptoms among a growing population, which could then create additional components to consider in treatments.
Identifier: CFH0004789 (IID), ucf:45330 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-05-01
B.S.
Sciences, Dept. of Psychology
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): marginalization
acculturative stress
Latinos
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004789
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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