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EFFECTS OF GAMIFICATION ON SPEED AND ACCURACY ON AN INTERDEPENDENT PAPER SORTING TASK

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Date Issued:
2015
Abstract/Description:
This study examined the effects of gamification, i.e. (what makes games challenging, engaging and fun), and its effects on speed and accuracy on an interdependent paper sorting task. Undergraduate students (N=42) at the University of Central Florida participated by working interdependently in groups to sort numbered pieces of paper into piles before and after either playing video games or doing back-to-back drawing(basic team building exercises). It was hypothesized that participants who played video games would sort pieces of paper into the piles faster and more accurate than those who did back-to-back team exercises. Results showed that playing video games was not better than doing basic team exercises, but that the two tasks were relatively equal. Although groups were formed and dissolved quickly, there was improvement between the pre and posttests. While the experiment did not yield significant results, it is possible that using different video games or different interdependent tasks could foster increases in speed and accuracy compared to back-to-back drawing.
Title: EFFECTS OF GAMIFICATION ON SPEED AND ACCURACY ON AN INTERDEPENDENT PAPER SORTING TASK.
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Name(s): Tinkle, Davis, Author
Salas, Eduardo, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This study examined the effects of gamification, i.e. (what makes games challenging, engaging and fun), and its effects on speed and accuracy on an interdependent paper sorting task. Undergraduate students (N=42) at the University of Central Florida participated by working interdependently in groups to sort numbered pieces of paper into piles before and after either playing video games or doing back-to-back drawing(basic team building exercises). It was hypothesized that participants who played video games would sort pieces of paper into the piles faster and more accurate than those who did back-to-back team exercises. Results showed that playing video games was not better than doing basic team exercises, but that the two tasks were relatively equal. Although groups were formed and dissolved quickly, there was improvement between the pre and posttests. While the experiment did not yield significant results, it is possible that using different video games or different interdependent tasks could foster increases in speed and accuracy compared to back-to-back drawing.
Identifier: CFH0004797 (IID), ucf:45331 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-05-01
B.S.
Sciences, Dept. of Psychology
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): gamification
video games
accuracy
speed
communication
cooperation
Portal 2
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004797
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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