You are here

EFFECTS OF CAFFEINATED ENERGY DRINK AND ALCOHOL USAGE ON PERCEIVED STRESS AND BURNOUT IN UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2015
Abstract/Description:
Caffeinated energy beverages (CEDs) are a growing supplement being consumed by a large number of young adults aged 18 to 24 years of age. As these CEDs contain nutritional supplements, they are not classified the same way other beverages such as sodas are and they can thus bypass regulation by the Food and Drug Administration. Without regulation by this governing body, it is important to understand how these supplements may be affecting their target population. In this study, students from a large university were recruited in order to determine patterns of CED usage as well as how CED usage may affect perceived stress and burnout. Alcohol usage, another type of beverage commonly consumed in this population, was also assayed in this group in order to determine how perceived stress and burnout are affected. The study was case-control in nature, as regular users of CEDs were compared against students who were not regular consumers. From the data, no major relationships could be identified in regards to perceived stress, burnout, and CED usage. However, extracurricular activity was found to be somewhat predictive of CED usage while alcohol usage was found to be negatively correlated with perceived stress.
Title: EFFECTS OF CAFFEINATED ENERGY DRINK AND ALCOHOL USAGE ON PERCEIVED STRESS AND BURNOUT IN UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS.
36 views
15 downloads
Name(s): Patel, Arjun, Author
Webster, Danielle, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Caffeinated energy beverages (CEDs) are a growing supplement being consumed by a large number of young adults aged 18 to 24 years of age. As these CEDs contain nutritional supplements, they are not classified the same way other beverages such as sodas are and they can thus bypass regulation by the Food and Drug Administration. Without regulation by this governing body, it is important to understand how these supplements may be affecting their target population. In this study, students from a large university were recruited in order to determine patterns of CED usage as well as how CED usage may affect perceived stress and burnout. Alcohol usage, another type of beverage commonly consumed in this population, was also assayed in this group in order to determine how perceived stress and burnout are affected. The study was case-control in nature, as regular users of CEDs were compared against students who were not regular consumers. From the data, no major relationships could be identified in regards to perceived stress, burnout, and CED usage. However, extracurricular activity was found to be somewhat predictive of CED usage while alcohol usage was found to be negatively correlated with perceived stress.
Identifier: CFH0004787 (IID), ucf:45333 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-05-01
B.S.
Health and Public Affairs, Dept. of Health Professions
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): stress
burnout
caffeine
energy
drink
undergraduate
perceived
health
science
alcohol
beverage
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004787
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections