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THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PATIENT EDUCATION AND ADHERENCE TO ANTIBIOTIC REGIMENS: EXPLORING PROFILES OF ADHERENT GROUPS

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Date Issued:
2015
Abstract/Description:
Objective: Currently, there does not exist a cohesive and predictive set of criteria that can be used to identify patients that are at risk of being non-adherent to antibiotic regimens. In this study, we sought to answer the question of whether patients' knowledge of the scientific background of antibiotic resistance is related to their likelihood to adhere to antibiotic regimens. Additionally, we explored other facets of the profiles of adherent and non-adherent subjects. Methods: All responses were collected via questionnaire. Subjects were split into two groups (adherent and non-adherent) based upon four patient-behavior questions. These two groups of subjects were compared in a variety of ways to test for significant differences in categories such as science knowledge, age, and self-reported understanding of the problem of antibiotic resistance. Results: It was determined that the adherent group of subjects had significantly higher science scores (mean=5.46, n=384) than the non-adherent subjects (mean=4.99, n=460); t(842)= -2.73, p=0.0064. Subjects majoring in STEM were more likely to be adherent than biology or non-STEM majors. There were no differences in adherence or science scores across age groups. About 26% of subjects had not previously heard of the problem of antibiotic resistance. Discussion: Increasing patient education on the topic of antibiotic resistance could increase patient adherence, which could in turn lead to a reduction in the rate at which bacteria develop resistance. Initiatives to educate patients and health care professionals have the potential to increase understanding and improve rates of adherence.
Title: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PATIENT EDUCATION AND ADHERENCE TO ANTIBIOTIC REGIMENS: EXPLORING PROFILES OF ADHERENT GROUPS.
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Name(s): McSweeney, Morgan, Author
Borgon, Robert, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Objective: Currently, there does not exist a cohesive and predictive set of criteria that can be used to identify patients that are at risk of being non-adherent to antibiotic regimens. In this study, we sought to answer the question of whether patients' knowledge of the scientific background of antibiotic resistance is related to their likelihood to adhere to antibiotic regimens. Additionally, we explored other facets of the profiles of adherent and non-adherent subjects. Methods: All responses were collected via questionnaire. Subjects were split into two groups (adherent and non-adherent) based upon four patient-behavior questions. These two groups of subjects were compared in a variety of ways to test for significant differences in categories such as science knowledge, age, and self-reported understanding of the problem of antibiotic resistance. Results: It was determined that the adherent group of subjects had significantly higher science scores (mean=5.46, n=384) than the non-adherent subjects (mean=4.99, n=460); t(842)= -2.73, p=0.0064. Subjects majoring in STEM were more likely to be adherent than biology or non-STEM majors. There were no differences in adherence or science scores across age groups. About 26% of subjects had not previously heard of the problem of antibiotic resistance. Discussion: Increasing patient education on the topic of antibiotic resistance could increase patient adherence, which could in turn lead to a reduction in the rate at which bacteria develop resistance. Initiatives to educate patients and health care professionals have the potential to increase understanding and improve rates of adherence.
Identifier: CFH0004784 (IID), ucf:45351 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-05-01
B.S.
Medicine, Dept. of Molecular Biology and Microbiology
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): antibiotic resistance
antibiotic
resistance
adherence
education
regimen
drug regimen
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004784
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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