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VIRTUAL TEAM COOPETITION: AN INVESTIGATION OF COOPETITIVE PROCLIVITY IN VIRTUAL AND FACE-TO-FACE FEMALE DYADS

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Date Issued:
2015
Abstract/Description:
The use of virtual teams (VTs) in the workplace has increased rapidly as companies seek to coordinate the collaboration of geographically dispersed employees effectively. This study involved an experimental comparison of VTs and face-to-face teams engaged in coopetition. Coopetition occurs when a relationship is characterized by simultaneous cooperation and competition. This study differed from previous research because many previous studies of team coopetition place their focus on traditional face-to-face teams and fail to touch upon the intricacies of VT coopetition. Because of this, investigating the intricacies of coopetition among VT members is an essential addition to the large body of research on face-to-face teams. This study examined team coopetition through separate measures of competitiveness and cooperativeness. The constructs competitiveness and cooperativeness were measured separately instead of together on a single continuum. This method determined team members' coopetitive proclivities, the balance between one's tendency to perform behaviors directed toward achieving a self-serving goal or goals and one's tendency to perform behaviors directed toward achieving a group-serving goal or goals within the context of a coopetitive relationship. Team members' coopetitive proclivities were examined through a combination of videogame play and electronic surveys. All participants in this experiment were female. No significant differences between the coopetitive proclivities of virtual and face-to-face teams were found. We found that the ratings of competence that participants received from their partners tended to be lower under the virtual condition. We found that extroverted team members were more likely to cooperate. We also found that the ratings of competitiveness that participants received from their partners were negatively correlated with the ratings of desirability for future collaboration (i.e., team viability) that participants received from their partners. Further, it was determined that the ratings of cooperativeness that participants received from their partners were positively correlated with the ratings of team viability that participants received from their partners. Additional results indicated a positive relationship between team members' self-reported levels of agreeableness and the ratings of competence that participants received from their partners. Results also indicated a positive relationship between team members' self-reported levels of openness and the ratings of competence that participants received from their partners. This paper discusses the implications of these results and possible directions for future study.
Title: VIRTUAL TEAM COOPETITION: AN INVESTIGATION OF COOPETITIVE PROCLIVITY IN VIRTUAL AND FACE-TO-FACE FEMALE DYADS.
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Name(s): Lutz, Andrew, Author
Chin, Matthew, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The use of virtual teams (VTs) in the workplace has increased rapidly as companies seek to coordinate the collaboration of geographically dispersed employees effectively. This study involved an experimental comparison of VTs and face-to-face teams engaged in coopetition. Coopetition occurs when a relationship is characterized by simultaneous cooperation and competition. This study differed from previous research because many previous studies of team coopetition place their focus on traditional face-to-face teams and fail to touch upon the intricacies of VT coopetition. Because of this, investigating the intricacies of coopetition among VT members is an essential addition to the large body of research on face-to-face teams. This study examined team coopetition through separate measures of competitiveness and cooperativeness. The constructs competitiveness and cooperativeness were measured separately instead of together on a single continuum. This method determined team members' coopetitive proclivities, the balance between one's tendency to perform behaviors directed toward achieving a self-serving goal or goals and one's tendency to perform behaviors directed toward achieving a group-serving goal or goals within the context of a coopetitive relationship. Team members' coopetitive proclivities were examined through a combination of videogame play and electronic surveys. All participants in this experiment were female. No significant differences between the coopetitive proclivities of virtual and face-to-face teams were found. We found that the ratings of competence that participants received from their partners tended to be lower under the virtual condition. We found that extroverted team members were more likely to cooperate. We also found that the ratings of competitiveness that participants received from their partners were negatively correlated with the ratings of desirability for future collaboration (i.e., team viability) that participants received from their partners. Further, it was determined that the ratings of cooperativeness that participants received from their partners were positively correlated with the ratings of team viability that participants received from their partners. Additional results indicated a positive relationship between team members' self-reported levels of agreeableness and the ratings of competence that participants received from their partners. Results also indicated a positive relationship between team members' self-reported levels of openness and the ratings of competence that participants received from their partners. This paper discusses the implications of these results and possible directions for future study.
Identifier: CFH0004743 (IID), ucf:45378 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-05-01
B.S.
Sciences, Dept. of Psychology
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): virtual teams
face-to-face teams
coopetition
coopetitive proclivity
dyadic teams
individual perceptions
competence
team viability
female dyads
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004743
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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