You are here

UNDERSTANDING AND MODELING PATHWAYS TO THROMBOSIS

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2015
Abstract/Description:
Intra-vessel thrombosis leads to serious problems in patient health. Coagulation can constrict blood flow and induce myocardial infarction or stroke. Hemodynamic factors in blood flow promote and inhibit the coagulation cascade. Mechanically, high shear stress has been shown to promote platelet activation while laminar flow maintains plasma layer separation of platelets and endothelial cells, preventing coagulation. These relationships are studied experimentally, however, physical properties of thrombi, such as density and viscosity, are lacking in data, preventing a comprehensive simulation of thrombus interaction. This study incorporates experimental findings from literature to compile a characteristic mechanical property data set for use in thrombosis simulation. The focus of this study's simulation explored how thrombi interact between other thrombi and vessel walls via Volume of Fluid method. The ability to predict thrombosis under specific hemodynamic conditions was also a feature of the data collection. Using patient specific vessel geometry, the findings in this study can be applied to simulate thrombosis scenarios. The possible applications of such a simulation include a more precise method for estimation of patient myocardial infarction or stroke risk and a possible analysis of vessel geometry modification under surgery.
Title: UNDERSTANDING AND MODELING PATHWAYS TO THROMBOSIS.
23 views
10 downloads
Name(s): Seligson, John, Author
Kassab, Alain, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Intra-vessel thrombosis leads to serious problems in patient health. Coagulation can constrict blood flow and induce myocardial infarction or stroke. Hemodynamic factors in blood flow promote and inhibit the coagulation cascade. Mechanically, high shear stress has been shown to promote platelet activation while laminar flow maintains plasma layer separation of platelets and endothelial cells, preventing coagulation. These relationships are studied experimentally, however, physical properties of thrombi, such as density and viscosity, are lacking in data, preventing a comprehensive simulation of thrombus interaction. This study incorporates experimental findings from literature to compile a characteristic mechanical property data set for use in thrombosis simulation. The focus of this study's simulation explored how thrombi interact between other thrombi and vessel walls via Volume of Fluid method. The ability to predict thrombosis under specific hemodynamic conditions was also a feature of the data collection. Using patient specific vessel geometry, the findings in this study can be applied to simulate thrombosis scenarios. The possible applications of such a simulation include a more precise method for estimation of patient myocardial infarction or stroke risk and a possible analysis of vessel geometry modification under surgery.
Identifier: CFH0004837 (IID), ucf:45440 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-05-01
B.S.
Engineering and Computer Science, Dept. of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): thrombus
thrombosis
properties
viscosity
density
shear
simulation
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004837
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections