You are here

MY BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL: A STUDY OF HOW HAIR IS PORTRAYED IN CHILDREN'S AND YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2015
Abstract/Description:
This research seeks to examine how authors represent Black/African-American beauty in children's literature. To conduct my research, I have chosen to review Natasha Tarpley's I Love My Hair and Carolivia Herron's Nappy Hair in conjunction with Zora Neale Hurston's young adult novel Their Eyes Were Watching God. The objective of my thesis aims to highlight the emphasis authors place on Black/African-American children's hair and the cultural differences in their perceptions of Afro-beauty. Today, society expends extensive time and interest in outward appearances through media: television, radio, digital media, and fashion magazines. As a result, Black/African-American adolescent and teen girls become overly concerned with their beauty and face extreme pressure to fit into the dominant cultures definition of beauty: �lighter skin, slender nose, slim body frame, and straight hair.' Black/African-American girls who fall short of the prescribed characteristics of beauty become psychologically impaired with their self-confidences; sometimes refusing to embrace their own features or invest extensively in beauty care products to conform to the dominant beliefs of beauty. I have provided a summary of the focused literature for the benefit of readers who not have had the opportunity to read the previously mentioned texts along with a sample lesson plan.
Title: MY BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL: A STUDY OF HOW HAIR IS PORTRAYED IN CHILDREN'S AND YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE.
15 views
7 downloads
Name(s): Webley, Quacy-Ann, Author
Kaplan, Jeffery, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This research seeks to examine how authors represent Black/African-American beauty in children's literature. To conduct my research, I have chosen to review Natasha Tarpley's I Love My Hair and Carolivia Herron's Nappy Hair in conjunction with Zora Neale Hurston's young adult novel Their Eyes Were Watching God. The objective of my thesis aims to highlight the emphasis authors place on Black/African-American children's hair and the cultural differences in their perceptions of Afro-beauty. Today, society expends extensive time and interest in outward appearances through media: television, radio, digital media, and fashion magazines. As a result, Black/African-American adolescent and teen girls become overly concerned with their beauty and face extreme pressure to fit into the dominant cultures definition of beauty: �lighter skin, slender nose, slim body frame, and straight hair.' Black/African-American girls who fall short of the prescribed characteristics of beauty become psychologically impaired with their self-confidences; sometimes refusing to embrace their own features or invest extensively in beauty care products to conform to the dominant beliefs of beauty. I have provided a summary of the focused literature for the benefit of readers who not have had the opportunity to read the previously mentioned texts along with a sample lesson plan.
Identifier: CFH0004818 (IID), ucf:45450 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-05-01
B.S.
Education, Dept. of Educational and Human Sciences
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Black Beauty
Hair
Nappy Hair
I love My Hair
Their Eyes Were Watching God
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004818
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections