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"I'M A STRONG INDEPENDENT BLACK WOMAN": THE COST OF STRONG BLACK WOMAN SCHEMA ENDORSEMENT

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Date Issued:
2019
Abstract/Description:
The Strong Black Woman Schema (SBWS) is a cultural expectation placed on black women to unfailingly display signs of strength and caretaker qualities, while suppressing their emotions. The present study aimed to examine the relationship between the SBWS and psychological distress, suicidal behaviors, and resilience. Researchers expected to find a positive relationship between the SBWS and psychological distress, a positive relationship between the SBWS and resilience, and an undefined relationship between the SBWS and suicidal behaviors. The study also examined the potential moderating effects of the SBWS and resilience on the existing psychological distress-suicidal behaviors relationship. Lastly, the study examined how socioeconomic status moderates the relationship between the SBWS and psychological distress. It was expected that the SBWS and resilience would weaken the relationship between psychological distress and suicidal behaviors; higher socioeconomic status would weaken the relationship between the SBWS and psychological distress. Researchers recruited 177 black women to take a 30-minute survey. A bivariate correlation analysis showed that the SBWS shares a positive relationship with psychological distress, including depression, anxiety, and stress, and suicidal behaviors. However, resilience was not associated with the SBWS. Resilience was found to moderate the psychological distress-suicidal behaviors relationship, while the SBWS did not. Socioeconomic status did not moderate the relationship between the SBWS and psychological distress. The findings of this study bear important clinical and community implications. By determining the harmful effects of the SBWS, further research can be conducted on how black woman, mental health professionals, and community advocates can mitigate its effects.
Title: "I'M A STRONG INDEPENDENT BLACK WOMAN": THE COST OF STRONG BLACK WOMAN SCHEMA ENDORSEMENT.
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Name(s): Castelin, Stephanie, Author
White, Grace, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2019
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The Strong Black Woman Schema (SBWS) is a cultural expectation placed on black women to unfailingly display signs of strength and caretaker qualities, while suppressing their emotions. The present study aimed to examine the relationship between the SBWS and psychological distress, suicidal behaviors, and resilience. Researchers expected to find a positive relationship between the SBWS and psychological distress, a positive relationship between the SBWS and resilience, and an undefined relationship between the SBWS and suicidal behaviors. The study also examined the potential moderating effects of the SBWS and resilience on the existing psychological distress-suicidal behaviors relationship. Lastly, the study examined how socioeconomic status moderates the relationship between the SBWS and psychological distress. It was expected that the SBWS and resilience would weaken the relationship between psychological distress and suicidal behaviors; higher socioeconomic status would weaken the relationship between the SBWS and psychological distress. Researchers recruited 177 black women to take a 30-minute survey. A bivariate correlation analysis showed that the SBWS shares a positive relationship with psychological distress, including depression, anxiety, and stress, and suicidal behaviors. However, resilience was not associated with the SBWS. Resilience was found to moderate the psychological distress-suicidal behaviors relationship, while the SBWS did not. Socioeconomic status did not moderate the relationship between the SBWS and psychological distress. The findings of this study bear important clinical and community implications. By determining the harmful effects of the SBWS, further research can be conducted on how black woman, mental health professionals, and community advocates can mitigate its effects.
Identifier: CFH2000494 (IID), ucf:45679 (fedora)
Note(s): 2019-05-01
B.S.
College of Sciences, Psychology
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): mental health
psychology
cultural competence
clinical psychology
cross-cultural psychology
african americans
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH2000494
Restrictions on Access: campus 2020-05-01
Host Institution: UCF

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