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SURFACTANT DRIVEN ASSEMBLY OF FREEZE-CASTED, POLYMER-DERIVED CERAMIC NANOPARTICLES ON GRAPEHENE OXIDE SHEETS FOR LITHIUM-ION BATTERY ANODES

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Date Issued:
2018
Abstract/Description:
Traditional Lithium-Ion Batteries (LIBs) are a reliable and cost-efficient choice for energy storage. LIBs offer high energy density and low self-discharge. Recent developments in electric-based technologies push for replacing historically used Lead-Acid batteries with LIBs. However, LIBs do not yet meet the demands of modern technology. Silicon and graphene oxide (GO) have been identified as promising replacements to improve anode materials. Graphene oxide has a unique sheet-like structure that provides a mechanically stable, light weight material for LIB anodes. Due to its structure, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is efficiently conductive and resistive to environmental changes. On the other hand, silicon-based anode materials offer the highest theoretical energy density and a high Li-ion loading capacity of various elements [20]. Silicon-based anodes that have previously been studied demonstrated extreme volumetric expansion over long cycles due to lithiation. Polysiloxane may be an interesting alternative as it is a Si-based material that can retain the high Li-ion loading capacity of Si while lacking the unattractive volumetric expansions of Si. Polymer derived ceramic-decorated graphene oxide anodes have been suggested to increase loading capacity, thermal resistance, power density, and mechanical stability of LIBs. Coupled with mechanically stable graphene oxide, polymer derived ceramic nanoparticle decorated graphene oxide anodes are studied to establish their efficiencies under operating conditions.
Title: SURFACTANT DRIVEN ASSEMBLY OF FREEZE-CASTED, POLYMER-DERIVED CERAMIC NANOPARTICLES ON GRAPEHENE OXIDE SHEETS FOR LITHIUM-ION BATTERY ANODES.
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Name(s): Khater, Ali Zein, Author
Tetard, Laurene, Committee Chair
Zhai, Lei, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2018
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Traditional Lithium-Ion Batteries (LIBs) are a reliable and cost-efficient choice for energy storage. LIBs offer high energy density and low self-discharge. Recent developments in electric-based technologies push for replacing historically used Lead-Acid batteries with LIBs. However, LIBs do not yet meet the demands of modern technology. Silicon and graphene oxide (GO) have been identified as promising replacements to improve anode materials. Graphene oxide has a unique sheet-like structure that provides a mechanically stable, light weight material for LIB anodes. Due to its structure, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is efficiently conductive and resistive to environmental changes. On the other hand, silicon-based anode materials offer the highest theoretical energy density and a high Li-ion loading capacity of various elements [20]. Silicon-based anodes that have previously been studied demonstrated extreme volumetric expansion over long cycles due to lithiation. Polysiloxane may be an interesting alternative as it is a Si-based material that can retain the high Li-ion loading capacity of Si while lacking the unattractive volumetric expansions of Si. Polymer derived ceramic-decorated graphene oxide anodes have been suggested to increase loading capacity, thermal resistance, power density, and mechanical stability of LIBs. Coupled with mechanically stable graphene oxide, polymer derived ceramic nanoparticle decorated graphene oxide anodes are studied to establish their efficiencies under operating conditions.
Identifier: CFH2000404 (IID), ucf:45765 (fedora)
Note(s): 2018-05-01
B.S.
College of Sciences, Physics
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): lithium ion battery
anode
electrode
graphene
graphene oxide
polymer-derived ceramic nanoparticles
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH2000404
Restrictions on Access: campus 2019-05-01
Host Institution: UCF

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