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WHOSE SUSTAINABILITY? AN ANALYSIS OF A COMMUNITY FARMING PROGRAM'S FOOD JUSTICE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY AGENDA

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Date Issued:
2018
Abstract/Description:
As the 1960s Environmental movement has grown, sustainability and justice discourses have come to the fore of the movement. While environmental justice discourse considers the unequal effects of environmental burdens, the language that frames "sustainability" is often socially and politically neutral. This thesis critically examines sustainability initiatives and practices of an urban farming organization in Florida. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in 2017, I explore the extent to which these initiatives incorporate race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class when working to provide sustainably grown food in diverse communities. I argue that the organization's focus on justice for the environment, rather than for communities, and education as a barrier in low-income, food desert neighborhoods neglects to integrate experiences of those living on the margins into their initiatives. This research raises awareness of the need for a critical examination of sustainability in practice and a politically aware incorporation of environmental justice themes into sustainability agendas.
Title: WHOSE SUSTAINABILITY? AN ANALYSIS OF A COMMUNITY FARMING PROGRAM'S FOOD JUSTICE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY AGENDA.
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Name(s): Davenport, Sarah, Author
Mishtal, Joanna, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2018
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: As the 1960s Environmental movement has grown, sustainability and justice discourses have come to the fore of the movement. While environmental justice discourse considers the unequal effects of environmental burdens, the language that frames "sustainability" is often socially and politically neutral. This thesis critically examines sustainability initiatives and practices of an urban farming organization in Florida. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in 2017, I explore the extent to which these initiatives incorporate race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class when working to provide sustainably grown food in diverse communities. I argue that the organization's focus on justice for the environment, rather than for communities, and education as a barrier in low-income, food desert neighborhoods neglects to integrate experiences of those living on the margins into their initiatives. This research raises awareness of the need for a critical examination of sustainability in practice and a politically aware incorporation of environmental justice themes into sustainability agendas.
Identifier: CFH2000402 (IID), ucf:45805 (fedora)
Note(s): 2018-05-01
B.A.
College of Sciences, Anthropology
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Food and environmental sustainability
urban anthropology
environmental justice
social justice
political ecology
Florida
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH2000402
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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