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INVESTIGATING THE ROLE OF THE GUT MICROBIOME IN HUNTINGTON DISEASE

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Date Issued:
2018
Abstract/Description:
Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a trinucleotide repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. Metabolic dysfunction is a feature of HD that is recapitulated in HD mouse models. Our lab has shown that circadian feeding rhythms are disrupted in humanized HD mice and restored by suppression of brain HTT. Furthermore, when circadian feeding rhythm is artificially restored, in addition to normalization of metabolic function, liver and striatal HTT is temporarily reduced, demonstrating that HTT is involved in gut-brain feedback. The gut microbiome, which can regulate gut-brain feedback, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other central nervous system disorders and we hypothesize it also plays a role in HD. The objective of this study is to investigate alterations in relative abundance of HD gut microbiota using existing plasma metabolomics data to identify candidate bacteria. If distinct microbiota profiles are demonstrated, this would provide the basis for future unbiased studies to investigate the complete HD microbiome.
Title: INVESTIGATING THE ROLE OF THE GUT MICROBIOME IN HUNTINGTON DISEASE.
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Name(s): Hart, Casey G, Author
Southwell, Amber, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2018
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a trinucleotide repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. Metabolic dysfunction is a feature of HD that is recapitulated in HD mouse models. Our lab has shown that circadian feeding rhythms are disrupted in humanized HD mice and restored by suppression of brain HTT. Furthermore, when circadian feeding rhythm is artificially restored, in addition to normalization of metabolic function, liver and striatal HTT is temporarily reduced, demonstrating that HTT is involved in gut-brain feedback. The gut microbiome, which can regulate gut-brain feedback, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other central nervous system disorders and we hypothesize it also plays a role in HD. The objective of this study is to investigate alterations in relative abundance of HD gut microbiota using existing plasma metabolomics data to identify candidate bacteria. If distinct microbiota profiles are demonstrated, this would provide the basis for future unbiased studies to investigate the complete HD microbiome.
Identifier: CFH2000418 (IID), ucf:45814 (fedora)
Note(s): 2018-12-01
B.S.
College of Medicine, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Huntington disease
gut microbiome
microbiota
metabolite
biomarker
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH2000418
Restrictions on Access: campus 2019-12-01
Host Institution: UCF

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