You are here

THE EFFECT OF CONTROLLING MESSAGES ON DOCTOR-PATIENT COMMUNICATION

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2018
Abstract/Description:

The doctor-patient relationship is a very important aspect of a patient's health and wellbeing. It is a complex relationship that requires trust and understanding by both parties. Doctor shopping and changes in technology that allow patients to independently learn about their health have further complicated this relationship. This study looks at how participants perceive controlling language depending on the gender of the doctor. Participants were 339 University of Central Florida undergraduate students (112 men and 227 women, age M= 19.29, SD = 3.60) recruited through SONA. Participants first listened to a recording of a male or female doctor speaking to a patient using high or low level controlling language. They then answered questions about their opinion of the doctor, how they would behave in the patient's situation, and their beliefs about the role of doctors in the doctor-patient relationship. Results indicated both level of controlling language and doctor gender had significant effects on participants' perception of the doctor. Doctors who spoke with high level controlling language were seen as less helpful and supportive than doctors who spoke with low level controlling language. Participants also were less likely to recommend them to another person. Male doctors were seen as ruder than female doctors. These results suggest that doctors must communicate with each patient in that makes them both the most comfortable, and that male doctors may need to work harder to communicate empathy to their patients.

Title: THE EFFECT OF CONTROLLING MESSAGES ON DOCTOR-PATIENT COMMUNICATION.
0 views
0 downloads
Name(s): LaDez, Kayla A, Author
Sims, Valerie, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2018
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description:

The doctor-patient relationship is a very important aspect of a patient's health and wellbeing. It is a complex relationship that requires trust and understanding by both parties. Doctor shopping and changes in technology that allow patients to independently learn about their health have further complicated this relationship. This study looks at how participants perceive controlling language depending on the gender of the doctor. Participants were 339 University of Central Florida undergraduate students (112 men and 227 women, age M= 19.29, SD = 3.60) recruited through SONA. Participants first listened to a recording of a male or female doctor speaking to a patient using high or low level controlling language. They then answered questions about their opinion of the doctor, how they would behave in the patient's situation, and their beliefs about the role of doctors in the doctor-patient relationship. Results indicated both level of controlling language and doctor gender had significant effects on participants' perception of the doctor. Doctors who spoke with high level controlling language were seen as less helpful and supportive than doctors who spoke with low level controlling language. Participants also were less likely to recommend them to another person. Male doctors were seen as ruder than female doctors. These results suggest that doctors must communicate with each patient in that makes them both the most comfortable, and that male doctors may need to work harder to communicate empathy to their patients.

Identifier: CFH2000336 (IID), ucf:45910 (fedora)
Note(s): 2018-05-01
B.S.
College of Sciences, Psychology
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Doctor
patient
communication
controlling language
gender
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH2000336
Restrictions on Access: campus 2019-05-01
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections