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THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERCEIVED GENDER DISCRIMINATION AND COUNTERPRODUCTIVE WORK BEHAVIORS

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Date Issued:
2017
Abstract/Description:
Counterproductive work behaviors are costly behaviors that individuals employ in retaliation to adverse stimuli in the workplace. This study specifically examined the relationship between perceived gender discrimination and counterproductive behaviors, using the variable of control as the mediator. This study also investigated the relationship between perceived gender discrimination and job turnover intentions as well as organizational commitment. Measures for perceived gender discrimination, control, counterproductive work behaviors, job turnover and organizational commitment were used to survey 97 participants on their workplace experiences and attitudes. It was found that perceived gender discrimination had a significant, positive correlation with counterproductive behaviors, as originally hypothesized. Perceived gender discrimination also had a significant negative correlation with organizational commitment. Control did not significantly correlate with counterproductive work behaviors, meaning it did not function as a mediator between counterproductive work behaviors and perceived gender discrimination, as hypothesized. The intent of this thesis was to examine perceived gender discrimination and control as antecedents of counterproductive behaviors. My findings suggest that perceived gender discrimination is correlated with these negative behaviors, thus promoting the importance of implementing programs to facilitate its reduction.
Title: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERCEIVED GENDER DISCRIMINATION AND COUNTERPRODUCTIVE WORK BEHAVIORS.
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Name(s): Jaffe, Rachel, Author
Shoss, Mindy, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2017
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Counterproductive work behaviors are costly behaviors that individuals employ in retaliation to adverse stimuli in the workplace. This study specifically examined the relationship between perceived gender discrimination and counterproductive behaviors, using the variable of control as the mediator. This study also investigated the relationship between perceived gender discrimination and job turnover intentions as well as organizational commitment. Measures for perceived gender discrimination, control, counterproductive work behaviors, job turnover and organizational commitment were used to survey 97 participants on their workplace experiences and attitudes. It was found that perceived gender discrimination had a significant, positive correlation with counterproductive behaviors, as originally hypothesized. Perceived gender discrimination also had a significant negative correlation with organizational commitment. Control did not significantly correlate with counterproductive work behaviors, meaning it did not function as a mediator between counterproductive work behaviors and perceived gender discrimination, as hypothesized. The intent of this thesis was to examine perceived gender discrimination and control as antecedents of counterproductive behaviors. My findings suggest that perceived gender discrimination is correlated with these negative behaviors, thus promoting the importance of implementing programs to facilitate its reduction.
Identifier: CFH2000198 (IID), ucf:45975 (fedora)
Note(s): 2017-05-01
B.S.
College of Sciences, Psychology
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Perceived gender discrimination
counterproductive work behaviors
sexism
workplace injustice
discrimination
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH2000198
Restrictions on Access: campus 2020-05-01
Host Institution: UCF

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