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DO YOU HAVE A FRIEND?: THE IMPACT OF PERSONAL KNOWLEDGE OF SOMEONE WITH AIDS ON ATTITUDES TOWARDS AIDS

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Date Issued:
2004
Abstract/Description:
ABSTRACT The study of attitudes towards those with AIDS is relatively recent. Most studies have examined attitudes concerning health and medical concerns. Little research has focused on attitudes toward social and behavior concerns. The few that have focused on such attitudes have employed relatively small samples collected primarily out of convenience. The studies that have used national samples have primarily addressed public policy issues. Using national data from the 1988 General Social Survey, this paper examines the effects of personal knowledge about the AIDS virus and other attitudinal variables on four dimensions of social and behavioral concern for those with AIDS in American society. Sociodemographic variables, which prior studies have demonstrated as important predictors of attitudes toward AIDS, are included as controls in this research that presents findings from a multivariate analysis. Results suggests that the impact of personal knowledge of someone with AIDS does not strongly lead to more supportive attitudes regarding the rights of people with AIDS, except when the economic costs of AIDS care is concerned. Directions for future research are presented and discussed.
Title: DO YOU HAVE A FRIEND?: THE IMPACT OF PERSONAL KNOWLEDGE OF SOMEONE WITH AIDS ON ATTITUDES TOWARDS AIDS.
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Name(s): Lombas, Leith Leonce, Author
Gay, David, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2004
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: ABSTRACT The study of attitudes towards those with AIDS is relatively recent. Most studies have examined attitudes concerning health and medical concerns. Little research has focused on attitudes toward social and behavior concerns. The few that have focused on such attitudes have employed relatively small samples collected primarily out of convenience. The studies that have used national samples have primarily addressed public policy issues. Using national data from the 1988 General Social Survey, this paper examines the effects of personal knowledge about the AIDS virus and other attitudinal variables on four dimensions of social and behavioral concern for those with AIDS in American society. Sociodemographic variables, which prior studies have demonstrated as important predictors of attitudes toward AIDS, are included as controls in this research that presents findings from a multivariate analysis. Results suggests that the impact of personal knowledge of someone with AIDS does not strongly lead to more supportive attitudes regarding the rights of people with AIDS, except when the economic costs of AIDS care is concerned. Directions for future research are presented and discussed.
Identifier: CFE0000010 (IID), ucf:46071 (fedora)
Note(s): 2004-05-01
MA
College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Sociology and Anthropology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): aids
hiv
stigma -- personal knowledge
attitudes
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000010
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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