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WATER QUALITY VARIATIONS DURING NITRIFICATION IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

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Date Issued:
2004
Abstract/Description:
This thesis documents the relationship among the major water quality parametersduring a nitrification episode. Nitrification unexpectedly occurred in a chloraminated pilotdrinking water distribution system practicing with a 4.0 mg/L as Cl2 residual dosed at 4.5:1Cl2:NH3-N. Surface, ground and sea water were treated and disinfected withmonochloramines to produce finished water quality similar to regional utility water quality.PVC, galvanized, unlined cast iron and lined iron pipes were harvested from regionaldistribution systems and used to build eighteen pilot distribution systems (PDSs). The PDSswere operated at a 5-day hydraulic residence time (HRT) and ambient temperatures.As seasonal temperatures increased the rate of monochloramine dissipation increaseduntil effluent PDS residuals were zero. PDSs effluent water quality parameters chloraminesresidual, dissolved oxygen, heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs), pH, alkalinity, and nitrogenspecies were monitored and found to vary as expected by stoichiometry associated withtheoretical biological reactions excepting alkalinity. Nitrification was confirmed in thePDSs. The occurrence in the PDSs was not isolated to any particular source water.Ammonia for nitrification came from degraded chloramines, which was common among allfinished waters. Consistent with nitrification trends of dissolved oxygen consumption,ammonia consumption, nitrite and nitrate production were clearly observed in the PDSs bulkwater quality profiles. Trends of pH and alkalinity were less apparent. To controlnitrification: residual was increased to 4.5 mg/L as Cl2 at 5:1 Cl2:NH3-N dosing ratio, and theHRT was reduced from 5 to 2 days. Elimination of the nitrification episode was achievedafter a 1 week free chlorine burn.
Title: WATER QUALITY VARIATIONS DURING NITRIFICATION IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS.
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Name(s): Webb, David W, Author
Taylor, James S., Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2004
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This thesis documents the relationship among the major water quality parametersduring a nitrification episode. Nitrification unexpectedly occurred in a chloraminated pilotdrinking water distribution system practicing with a 4.0 mg/L as Cl2 residual dosed at 4.5:1Cl2:NH3-N. Surface, ground and sea water were treated and disinfected withmonochloramines to produce finished water quality similar to regional utility water quality.PVC, galvanized, unlined cast iron and lined iron pipes were harvested from regionaldistribution systems and used to build eighteen pilot distribution systems (PDSs). The PDSswere operated at a 5-day hydraulic residence time (HRT) and ambient temperatures.As seasonal temperatures increased the rate of monochloramine dissipation increaseduntil effluent PDS residuals were zero. PDSs effluent water quality parameters chloraminesresidual, dissolved oxygen, heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs), pH, alkalinity, and nitrogenspecies were monitored and found to vary as expected by stoichiometry associated withtheoretical biological reactions excepting alkalinity. Nitrification was confirmed in thePDSs. The occurrence in the PDSs was not isolated to any particular source water.Ammonia for nitrification came from degraded chloramines, which was common among allfinished waters. Consistent with nitrification trends of dissolved oxygen consumption,ammonia consumption, nitrite and nitrate production were clearly observed in the PDSs bulkwater quality profiles. Trends of pH and alkalinity were less apparent. To controlnitrification: residual was increased to 4.5 mg/L as Cl2 at 5:1 Cl2:NH3-N dosing ratio, and theHRT was reduced from 5 to 2 days. Elimination of the nitrification episode was achievedafter a 1 week free chlorine burn.
Identifier: CFE0000063 (IID), ucf:46118 (fedora)
Note(s): 2004-05-01
M.S.Env.E.
College of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Nitrification
Chloramines
Distribution System
Drinking Water
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000063
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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