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AN INVESTIGATION INTO PROVIDING FEEDBACK TO USERS OF DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS FOR FAULT MANAGEMENT

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Date Issued:
2004
Abstract/Description:
Research in several domains has shown that the implementation of computerized decision support aids is often associated with issues of human-automation interaction, which can have disastrous consequences. One often-cited reason for these issues is the poor quality of the feedback that is provided to the operators through these tools. The objective of the proposed investigation is to examine how providing feedback through a decision support tool affects operator knowledge and performance in the context of a fault management task for naval gunfire support. A one-way between-groups comparison was made to investigate differences between providing decision support feedback (logic trace, mission impact, both, no feedback) in a fault management task. Logic trace feedback was posited to provide users with a representation of the logic that the decision support tool used in reaching a conclusion about the best course of action to perform and is posited to support better diagnostic performance. Mission impact feedback was posited to provide the operator with a description of the potential effects that a taking a course of action will have on the pre-planned mission and is expected to support better prognoses of the outcome of a particular fault. Finally, providing both feedback types was posited to support better compensatory actions for fault situations. Results indicated that decision support feedback has potential improve diagnosis and decrease errors of commission in these tasks.
Title: AN INVESTIGATION INTO PROVIDING FEEDBACK TO USERS OF DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS FOR FAULT MANAGEMENT.
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Name(s): Pharmer, James, Author
Bowers, Clint, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2004
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Research in several domains has shown that the implementation of computerized decision support aids is often associated with issues of human-automation interaction, which can have disastrous consequences. One often-cited reason for these issues is the poor quality of the feedback that is provided to the operators through these tools. The objective of the proposed investigation is to examine how providing feedback through a decision support tool affects operator knowledge and performance in the context of a fault management task for naval gunfire support. A one-way between-groups comparison was made to investigate differences between providing decision support feedback (logic trace, mission impact, both, no feedback) in a fault management task. Logic trace feedback was posited to provide users with a representation of the logic that the decision support tool used in reaching a conclusion about the best course of action to perform and is posited to support better diagnostic performance. Mission impact feedback was posited to provide the operator with a description of the potential effects that a taking a course of action will have on the pre-planned mission and is expected to support better prognoses of the outcome of a particular fault. Finally, providing both feedback types was posited to support better compensatory actions for fault situations. Results indicated that decision support feedback has potential improve diagnosis and decrease errors of commission in these tasks.
Identifier: CFE0000234 (IID), ucf:46249 (fedora)
Note(s): 2004-12-01
Ph.D.
Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): decision support
fault management
automation feedback
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000234
Restrictions on Access: campus 2005-01-31
Host Institution: UCF

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