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RIGHT TURN SPLIT: A NEW DESIGN TO ALLEVIATE WEAVING ON ARTERIAL STREETS

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Date Issued:
2005
Abstract/Description:
While weaving maneuvers occur on every type of roadway, most studies have focused on freeway maneuvers. Weaving occurring on non-freeway facilities, such as arterial streets, can cause significant operational problems. Arterial streets weaving typically occur when vehicles coming from a side street at an upstream intersection attempt to enter the main street from one side to reach access points on the opposite site at a downstream intersection by crossing one or more lanes. This dissertation investigates the type of problems occurring on arterial streets due to the weaving movements and recommends a new design to alleviate weaving on arterial streets. Firstly, the dissertation examined the different weaving movements occurring between two close-spaced intersections at two sites in Florida and explained the breakdown conditions caused by the weaving movements at the two sites. Secondly, the dissertation proposed a new design, Right Turn Split (RTS), to alleviate the delay caused by the weaving movements. The new design proposed separating the worst weaving movement entering the arterial from the other movements and providing a separate path for this movement. The new method is easy to implement and does not require much right of way. Thirdly, the dissertation compared two microscopic models, SimTraffic and VISSIM, to choose the most suitable model to be used to study the operational benefits of the RTS design. Based on the results of the comparison, it was decided to use SimTraffic for the analysis. Fourthly, the dissertation proposed a new calibration and validation procedure for microscopic simulation models. The procedure was applied on SimTraffic using the traffic data from the two studied sites. The proposed procedure appeared to be properly calibrating and validating the SimTraffic simulation model. Finally, the calibrated and validated model was used to study the operational benefits of the RTS design. Using a wide range of geometric and volume conditions, 729 before and after pairs were created to compare the delay of similar scenarios before and after applying the RTS design. The results were analyzed graphically and statistically. The findings of the analysis showed that the RTS design provided lower delay on the arterial street than the original conditions.
Title: RIGHT TURN SPLIT: A NEW DESIGN TO ALLEVIATE WEAVING ON ARTERIAL STREETS.
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Name(s): Shaaban, Khaled, Author
Radwan, Essam, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2005
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: While weaving maneuvers occur on every type of roadway, most studies have focused on freeway maneuvers. Weaving occurring on non-freeway facilities, such as arterial streets, can cause significant operational problems. Arterial streets weaving typically occur when vehicles coming from a side street at an upstream intersection attempt to enter the main street from one side to reach access points on the opposite site at a downstream intersection by crossing one or more lanes. This dissertation investigates the type of problems occurring on arterial streets due to the weaving movements and recommends a new design to alleviate weaving on arterial streets. Firstly, the dissertation examined the different weaving movements occurring between two close-spaced intersections at two sites in Florida and explained the breakdown conditions caused by the weaving movements at the two sites. Secondly, the dissertation proposed a new design, Right Turn Split (RTS), to alleviate the delay caused by the weaving movements. The new design proposed separating the worst weaving movement entering the arterial from the other movements and providing a separate path for this movement. The new method is easy to implement and does not require much right of way. Thirdly, the dissertation compared two microscopic models, SimTraffic and VISSIM, to choose the most suitable model to be used to study the operational benefits of the RTS design. Based on the results of the comparison, it was decided to use SimTraffic for the analysis. Fourthly, the dissertation proposed a new calibration and validation procedure for microscopic simulation models. The procedure was applied on SimTraffic using the traffic data from the two studied sites. The proposed procedure appeared to be properly calibrating and validating the SimTraffic simulation model. Finally, the calibrated and validated model was used to study the operational benefits of the RTS design. Using a wide range of geometric and volume conditions, 729 before and after pairs were created to compare the delay of similar scenarios before and after applying the RTS design. The results were analyzed graphically and statistically. The findings of the analysis showed that the RTS design provided lower delay on the arterial street than the original conditions.
Identifier: CFE0000402 (IID), ucf:46346 (fedora)
Note(s): 2005-05-01
Ph.D.
Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): weaving
intersection
design
arterial
simulation
right turn split
delay
before and after
traffic
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000402
Restrictions on Access: campus 2007-01-31
Host Institution: UCF

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