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THE RELATIONSHIP OF PARENT AND CHILD SELF-TALK IN A COLLEGE SAMPLE

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Date Issued:
2005
Abstract/Description:
Research has demonstrated the importance of early social interactions in the development of self-talk. It does not appear, however, that existing research has examined the relationship between parents' self-talk and the self-talk that develops in their children. This study examined the relationship between self-talk in parents and their college-age children. Results revealed significant relationships between students' and parents' positive self-talk, but not negative self-talk. Marginal relationships were found for self-talk ratios (ratios of positive and negative self-talk). Maternal communication was found to mediate the relationship between students' and their mothers' positive self-talk. Different trends also were noted between genders. Finally, self-talk was related significantly to depression, anxiety, and self-esteem. Overall, results of this study emphasize the relationship between parents' and their children's positive self-talk and the importance of self-talk in psychological functioning. These findings lend promise to the possibility of modifying parents' self-talk and communication as a way to modify their children's self-talk and psychological functioning.
Title: THE RELATIONSHIP OF PARENT AND CHILD SELF-TALK IN A COLLEGE SAMPLE.
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Name(s): Donnelly, Reesa, Author
Renk, Kimberly, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2005
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Research has demonstrated the importance of early social interactions in the development of self-talk. It does not appear, however, that existing research has examined the relationship between parents' self-talk and the self-talk that develops in their children. This study examined the relationship between self-talk in parents and their college-age children. Results revealed significant relationships between students' and parents' positive self-talk, but not negative self-talk. Marginal relationships were found for self-talk ratios (ratios of positive and negative self-talk). Maternal communication was found to mediate the relationship between students' and their mothers' positive self-talk. Different trends also were noted between genders. Finally, self-talk was related significantly to depression, anxiety, and self-esteem. Overall, results of this study emphasize the relationship between parents' and their children's positive self-talk and the importance of self-talk in psychological functioning. These findings lend promise to the possibility of modifying parents' self-talk and communication as a way to modify their children's self-talk and psychological functioning.
Identifier: CFE0000414 (IID), ucf:46401 (fedora)
Note(s): 2005-05-01
M.S.
Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Self-Talk
Parent Child Relations
Automatic Thoughts
Inner Speech
Self-Esteem
Depression
Anxiety
Communication
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000414
Restrictions on Access: campus 2015-01-31
Host Institution: UCF

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