You are here

COUPLE PLAY AS A PREDICTOR OF COUPLE BONDING, PHYSICAL HEALTH AND EMOTIONAL HEALTH

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2005
Abstract/Description:
Traditional couple counseling research focused on why people end relationships, with research only recently addressing what factors contribute to relationship satisfaction and stability. Yet, throughout this research, minimal attention has been paid to the role of play in couple counseling. The research available on play in couple counseling had varied definitions of couple play and was not based on current couple counseling theory. The research and anecdotal data on couple play proposed a strong relationship between couple play and the factors that predict successful, long-term couple relationships, individual physical health and emotional health. This study applied current couple counseling theory and research to define couple play and the relationship between couple play and couple bonding, physical health and emotional health. The hypotheses of the study were couple play would predict couple bonding; couple play would predict individual physical health; and couple play would predict individual emotional health. The results from a sample of 30 couples demonstrated couple play predicted measures of couple bonding, including relationship satisfaction, communication, conflict resolution, and the couple's view of the relationship. Couple play demonstrated no relationship to individual physical or emotional health. Since couple play was predictive of successful, long-term couple relationship measures, the implications were discussed for using couple play in assessment and intervention in couple counseling and future research.
Title: COUPLE PLAY AS A PREDICTOR OF COUPLE BONDING, PHYSICAL HEALTH AND EMOTIONAL HEALTH.
31 views
26 downloads
Name(s): Vanderbleek, Linda, Author
Robinson, Edward, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2005
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Traditional couple counseling research focused on why people end relationships, with research only recently addressing what factors contribute to relationship satisfaction and stability. Yet, throughout this research, minimal attention has been paid to the role of play in couple counseling. The research available on play in couple counseling had varied definitions of couple play and was not based on current couple counseling theory. The research and anecdotal data on couple play proposed a strong relationship between couple play and the factors that predict successful, long-term couple relationships, individual physical health and emotional health. This study applied current couple counseling theory and research to define couple play and the relationship between couple play and couple bonding, physical health and emotional health. The hypotheses of the study were couple play would predict couple bonding; couple play would predict individual physical health; and couple play would predict individual emotional health. The results from a sample of 30 couples demonstrated couple play predicted measures of couple bonding, including relationship satisfaction, communication, conflict resolution, and the couple's view of the relationship. Couple play demonstrated no relationship to individual physical or emotional health. Since couple play was predictive of successful, long-term couple relationship measures, the implications were discussed for using couple play in assessment and intervention in couple counseling and future research.
Identifier: CFE0000426 (IID), ucf:46403 (fedora)
Note(s): 2005-05-01
Ph.D.
Education, Department of Child, Family and Community Sciences
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Couple Play
Couple Bonding
Physical and Emotional Health
Couple Counseling
Couple Counseling Intervention
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000426
Restrictions on Access: campus 2015-01-31
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections