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NAVIGATION AIDS IN ROUTE TRAINING: INCREASE NAVIGATION SPEED, DECREASE ROUTE RETENTION?

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Date Issued:
2005
Abstract/Description:
In the case of one car following another to a destination, it is very effective at getting the second vehicle to the destination quickly; however, the driver of the second car may not learn the route. Yet, for individuals, such as firefighters, law enforcement, and military personnel, it is imperative that a route be learned quickly and accurately and that an awareness of the situation is maintained while they traverse the given route. This leads to three questions, (a) will navigation aids affect initial route navigation; (b) will navigation aids affect retention; and (c) will navigation aids affect situation awareness while en route? The hypotheses of this study were that navigation aids would significantly increase the speed at which a person can initially navigate a route, but the use of the aids would significantly decrease the retention of the route navigated. The findings of this study support the hypotheses. The results suggest that participants that followed a confederate and participants that were given verbal directions were quicker and made fewer errors than participants that reviewed a map or initially figured the route out on their own (control group). The study also showed that as the participants navigated the route for a second time with no navigational assistance, the ones that reviewed a map or that were in the control group outperformed participants that initially had a confederate to follow or were given verbal directions their first time through. Finally, no real effects were found on the participants' situation awareness during the retention portion of the study.
Title: NAVIGATION AIDS IN ROUTE TRAINING: INCREASE NAVIGATION SPEED, DECREASE ROUTE RETENTION?.
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Name(s): Holmquist, John, Author
Lee, Gene, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2005
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: In the case of one car following another to a destination, it is very effective at getting the second vehicle to the destination quickly; however, the driver of the second car may not learn the route. Yet, for individuals, such as firefighters, law enforcement, and military personnel, it is imperative that a route be learned quickly and accurately and that an awareness of the situation is maintained while they traverse the given route. This leads to three questions, (a) will navigation aids affect initial route navigation; (b) will navigation aids affect retention; and (c) will navigation aids affect situation awareness while en route? The hypotheses of this study were that navigation aids would significantly increase the speed at which a person can initially navigate a route, but the use of the aids would significantly decrease the retention of the route navigated. The findings of this study support the hypotheses. The results suggest that participants that followed a confederate and participants that were given verbal directions were quicker and made fewer errors than participants that reviewed a map or initially figured the route out on their own (control group). The study also showed that as the participants navigated the route for a second time with no navigational assistance, the ones that reviewed a map or that were in the control group outperformed participants that initially had a confederate to follow or were given verbal directions their first time through. Finally, no real effects were found on the participants' situation awareness during the retention portion of the study.
Identifier: CFE0000520 (IID), ucf:46453 (fedora)
Note(s): 2005-05-01
Ph.D.
Engineering and Computer Science, Other
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Training
Route
Simulation
Model
Navigation
Retention
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000520
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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