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PREFERRED HABITAT FOR LIQUIDITYIN INTERNATIONAL SHORT-TERM INTEREST RATES

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Date Issued:
2005
Abstract/Description:
U.S. money market securities have been found to exhibit behavior consistent with preferred habitat for liquidity around year-ends (Griffiths and Winters (1997, 2004)). In particular, repurchase agreement and commercial paper yields tend to increase when the security begins to mature across the end of the year, and return to normal levels after the year-end obligations have been paid but before the calendar year-end. The competing hypothesis, window dressing by financial intermediaries around disclosure dates, requires that the increase in yields be sustained until after the turn of the year. This study is aimed at finding whether the behavior of international money markets around year-ends and quarter-ends is more consistent with preferred habitat for liquidity or window dressing. This is done by analyzing changes in LIBOR for different currencies around quarter-ends. A second part of the study considers the effect of preferred habitat on the term structure of short-term interest rates. The expectations hypothesis of the term structure posits that future expected interest rates are implied by the current term structure. Empirical research suggests that the expectations hypothesis often does not hold, especially at the short end of the term structure. Preferred habitat for liquidity in short-term rates may be one of the reasons for the failure of expectations. The same LIBOR data set is used to test for the expectations in the presence of preferred habitat for liquidity. The empirical results of this study suggest that preferred habitat for liquidity in the short-term rates around quarter-ends and year-ends is not responsible for the failure of the expectations hypothesis in the data.
Title: PREFERRED HABITAT FOR LIQUIDITYIN INTERNATIONAL SHORT-TERM INTEREST RATES.
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Name(s): Kotomin, Vladimir, Author
Smith, Stanley, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2005
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: U.S. money market securities have been found to exhibit behavior consistent with preferred habitat for liquidity around year-ends (Griffiths and Winters (1997, 2004)). In particular, repurchase agreement and commercial paper yields tend to increase when the security begins to mature across the end of the year, and return to normal levels after the year-end obligations have been paid but before the calendar year-end. The competing hypothesis, window dressing by financial intermediaries around disclosure dates, requires that the increase in yields be sustained until after the turn of the year. This study is aimed at finding whether the behavior of international money markets around year-ends and quarter-ends is more consistent with preferred habitat for liquidity or window dressing. This is done by analyzing changes in LIBOR for different currencies around quarter-ends. A second part of the study considers the effect of preferred habitat on the term structure of short-term interest rates. The expectations hypothesis of the term structure posits that future expected interest rates are implied by the current term structure. Empirical research suggests that the expectations hypothesis often does not hold, especially at the short end of the term structure. Preferred habitat for liquidity in short-term rates may be one of the reasons for the failure of expectations. The same LIBOR data set is used to test for the expectations in the presence of preferred habitat for liquidity. The empirical results of this study suggest that preferred habitat for liquidity in the short-term rates around quarter-ends and year-ends is not responsible for the failure of the expectations hypothesis in the data.
Identifier: CFE0000583 (IID), ucf:46470 (fedora)
Note(s): 2005-08-01
Ph.D.
Business Administration, Department of Finance
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Preferred Habitat
Expectations Hypothesis
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000583
Restrictions on Access: campus 2007-01-31
Host Institution: UCF

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