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ACCURACY OF PARENTAL REPORT ON PHONOLOGICAL INVENTORIES OF TODDLERS

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Date Issued:
2005
Abstract/Description:
Considering the diminishing availability of professional resources, increasing costs, and time requirements involved in early childhood mass screenings, parents are an essential source of information. In this study, the Survey of Speech Development (SSD) (Perry-Carson & Steel, 2001; Steel, 2000) was used to determine the accuracy of parents in reporting the speech sound inventories of their toddlers. Parents of 30 children, who were between the ages of 27 to 33 months old, completed the SSD prior to a speech and language assessment session. Based on assessment results, the children were classified as normal developing or language delayed. A 20-minute play interaction between the parent and child was recorded during the assessment and was transcribed later for analysis. Speech sounds (consonants) were coded as present or absent and comparisons were made between the parents results on the SSD and data from the 20-minute speech sample. A point-by-point reliability analysis of the speech sounds on the SSD compared to those produced in the speech sample revealed an overall parental accuracy of 75%. Further, no differences were found between parent reports and transcribed accounts for total number of different consonants. This was true for parents of both language delayed and language normal toddlers. Results suggest that if given a systematic means of providing information, parents are a reliable source of information regarding sounds their toddlers produce.
Title: ACCURACY OF PARENTAL REPORT ON PHONOLOGICAL INVENTORIES OF TODDLERS.
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Name(s): Teske, Kristin, Author
Carson, Cecyle, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2005
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Considering the diminishing availability of professional resources, increasing costs, and time requirements involved in early childhood mass screenings, parents are an essential source of information. In this study, the Survey of Speech Development (SSD) (Perry-Carson & Steel, 2001; Steel, 2000) was used to determine the accuracy of parents in reporting the speech sound inventories of their toddlers. Parents of 30 children, who were between the ages of 27 to 33 months old, completed the SSD prior to a speech and language assessment session. Based on assessment results, the children were classified as normal developing or language delayed. A 20-minute play interaction between the parent and child was recorded during the assessment and was transcribed later for analysis. Speech sounds (consonants) were coded as present or absent and comparisons were made between the parents results on the SSD and data from the 20-minute speech sample. A point-by-point reliability analysis of the speech sounds on the SSD compared to those produced in the speech sample revealed an overall parental accuracy of 75%. Further, no differences were found between parent reports and transcribed accounts for total number of different consonants. This was true for parents of both language delayed and language normal toddlers. Results suggest that if given a systematic means of providing information, parents are a reliable source of information regarding sounds their toddlers produce.
Identifier: CFE0000676 (IID), ucf:46543 (fedora)
Note(s): 2005-08-01
M.A.
Health and Public Affairs, Department of Communicative Disorders
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Phonological Development
Parent Surveys
Speech Screenings
Parental Accuracy
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000676
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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