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RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ADOLESCENT BEHAVIOR AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

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Date Issued:
2005
Abstract/Description:
Citizenship – commitment to and participation in a political community - is the heart of constitutional democracy and a free society. Knowledge of the rights, responsibilities, and privileges are the electrical impulses that keep a steady beat. Without the participation of educated citizens, a democratic republic can not and does not function. This study analyzed the relationship between adolescent behavior and civic engagement. This task was accomplished by examining the amount of civic knowledge possessed by two groups within a population. The population examined, a high school in Flagler County, was composed of "at risk" students (those who had an Individualized Education Plan) and "regular" students (those that did not). The study uncovered the message that the amount of civic knowledge possessed by American youth was not as important as it was for them to be engaged in extracurricular activities. During the course of time, educators appear to have restricted their own ability to plan for and provide learning experiences that take in to consideration the physical characteristics; physical needs; patterns of growth and maturation; physiological changes; intellectual development; intellectual characteristics; learning preferences and styles; emotional development; personality development; and social development of each and every young adolescent attending school. When interesting, affordable activities are not made available, students become bored and get in to trouble during after school hours. Adolescent behaviors such as moral judgment and risk taking (or lack thereof) affect their decision to become civically involved.
Title: RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ADOLESCENT BEHAVIOR AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT.
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Name(s): Ernst, Michael, Author
Murray, Barbara , Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2005
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Citizenship – commitment to and participation in a political community - is the heart of constitutional democracy and a free society. Knowledge of the rights, responsibilities, and privileges are the electrical impulses that keep a steady beat. Without the participation of educated citizens, a democratic republic can not and does not function. This study analyzed the relationship between adolescent behavior and civic engagement. This task was accomplished by examining the amount of civic knowledge possessed by two groups within a population. The population examined, a high school in Flagler County, was composed of "at risk" students (those who had an Individualized Education Plan) and "regular" students (those that did not). The study uncovered the message that the amount of civic knowledge possessed by American youth was not as important as it was for them to be engaged in extracurricular activities. During the course of time, educators appear to have restricted their own ability to plan for and provide learning experiences that take in to consideration the physical characteristics; physical needs; patterns of growth and maturation; physiological changes; intellectual development; intellectual characteristics; learning preferences and styles; emotional development; personality development; and social development of each and every young adolescent attending school. When interesting, affordable activities are not made available, students become bored and get in to trouble during after school hours. Adolescent behaviors such as moral judgment and risk taking (or lack thereof) affect their decision to become civically involved.
Identifier: CFE0000764 (IID), ucf:46585 (fedora)
Note(s): 2005-12-01
Ed.D.
Education, Department of Educational Research, Technology and Leadership
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): adolescent behavior
civic engagement
civic education
engagement in extracurricular activities
social development
emotional development
intellectual development
learning preferences
learning styles
personality development
patterns of growth
moral judgment
risk taking
peer pressure
cognitive distortion
civic knowledge
juvenile delinquency
democracy
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000764
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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