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PERCEIVED STRESS, COPING, AND ADEQUACY OF SOCIAL SUPPORT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SUBJECTIVE WELL-BEING IN COLLEGE STUDENTS

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Date Issued:
2005
Abstract/Description:
Stress is a widespread concept commonly associated with psychological and medical problems that may impair an individual's functioning and incur costs on society. Alarming rates of depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, and other stress-related problems have been found among college students. This study (N = 241)argues that reducing emotional and financial stress-related costs may be possible through increasing public and professional awareness of moderating variables, such as social support and coping resources. Results indicated that stress, inadequate social support, and escape-avoidance coping were related to higher levels of depression and lower life satisfaction in both males and females. Social support functioned as a moderator of stress in determining negative outcomes, primarily during high stress. Specifically, the interaction between stress and social support predicted depression in the combined sample, anxiety in males, and life satisfaction in females. In addition, the present study highlights the importance of accounting for gender in research concerning stress, social support, coping, and psychological adjustment. Finally, limitations and suggestions for future research will be discussed.
Title: PERCEIVED STRESS, COPING, AND ADEQUACY OF SOCIAL SUPPORT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SUBJECTIVE WELL-BEING IN COLLEGE STUDENTS.
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Name(s): Asberg, Kia, Author
Bowers, Clint, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2005
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Stress is a widespread concept commonly associated with psychological and medical problems that may impair an individual's functioning and incur costs on society. Alarming rates of depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, and other stress-related problems have been found among college students. This study (N = 241)argues that reducing emotional and financial stress-related costs may be possible through increasing public and professional awareness of moderating variables, such as social support and coping resources. Results indicated that stress, inadequate social support, and escape-avoidance coping were related to higher levels of depression and lower life satisfaction in both males and females. Social support functioned as a moderator of stress in determining negative outcomes, primarily during high stress. Specifically, the interaction between stress and social support predicted depression in the combined sample, anxiety in males, and life satisfaction in females. In addition, the present study highlights the importance of accounting for gender in research concerning stress, social support, coping, and psychological adjustment. Finally, limitations and suggestions for future research will be discussed.
Identifier: CFE0000882 (IID), ucf:46634 (fedora)
Note(s): 2005-12-01
M.S.
Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): stress
social support
coping
college students
adjustment
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000882
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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