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COMMUNITY COLLEGE LEADERSHIP IN THE 21ST CENTURY

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Date Issued:
2005
Abstract/Description:
The purpose of this study was to explore with community college presidents of 292 Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Level 1 institutions their perceptions as to the extent to which selected leadership styles presently required in the performance of presidential duties may be required in the future. Also investigated were leadership succession planning and professional development initiatives aimed at identifying and developing future leaders. A total of 209 (71.6%) presidents completed a researcher designed survey. Data analysis resulted in the following major findings. The presidents indicated a high level of support for each of the five leadership styles for current presidents as well as for future leaders. A consultative style of leadership was deemed to be the most important form of leadership for current leaders and increasing in importance for future leaders. Participative leadership was ranked second and could be considered as a transitional alternative for new presidents. The delegative and negotiative leadership styles were cited as the third and fourth most important forms of leadership for current and future leaders. Fifth ranked was the directive or autocratic style of leadership. Three-fourths of community college presidents indicated that they were actively engaged in the identification and development of potential leaders. Presidents were highly supportive of six developmental areas (budgeting, financial management, fund raising, governing boards, internal governance, and politics/relationships) but perceived politics and relationships as being the most critical area of development for future presidents. Presidents, with less than 10 years of service, were more actively engaged in identifying potential future leaders than their longer tenured counterparts. Those planning to retire within the next 6 years indicated the highest level of engagement. Institutional leaders who had been identified for advancement in a succession plan during their careers were more likely to have a succession plan in place in their institution; however, succession planning was largely informal.
Title: COMMUNITY COLLEGE LEADERSHIP IN THE 21ST CENTURY.
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Name(s): Van Dusen, Laurie , Author
Bozeman, William, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2005
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The purpose of this study was to explore with community college presidents of 292 Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Level 1 institutions their perceptions as to the extent to which selected leadership styles presently required in the performance of presidential duties may be required in the future. Also investigated were leadership succession planning and professional development initiatives aimed at identifying and developing future leaders. A total of 209 (71.6%) presidents completed a researcher designed survey. Data analysis resulted in the following major findings. The presidents indicated a high level of support for each of the five leadership styles for current presidents as well as for future leaders. A consultative style of leadership was deemed to be the most important form of leadership for current leaders and increasing in importance for future leaders. Participative leadership was ranked second and could be considered as a transitional alternative for new presidents. The delegative and negotiative leadership styles were cited as the third and fourth most important forms of leadership for current and future leaders. Fifth ranked was the directive or autocratic style of leadership. Three-fourths of community college presidents indicated that they were actively engaged in the identification and development of potential leaders. Presidents were highly supportive of six developmental areas (budgeting, financial management, fund raising, governing boards, internal governance, and politics/relationships) but perceived politics and relationships as being the most critical area of development for future presidents. Presidents, with less than 10 years of service, were more actively engaged in identifying potential future leaders than their longer tenured counterparts. Those planning to retire within the next 6 years indicated the highest level of engagement. Institutional leaders who had been identified for advancement in a succession plan during their careers were more likely to have a succession plan in place in their institution; however, succession planning was largely informal.
Identifier: CFE0000850 (IID), ucf:46664 (fedora)
Note(s): 2005-12-01
Ed.D.
Education, Department of Educational Research, Technology and Leadership
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Community College Leadership
Leadership
Community College
Development
Succession Planning
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000850
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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