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CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY AS A TOOL FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF TETRACYCLINE FLUORESCENCE IN ARCHAEOLOGICALHUMAN BONE

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Date Issued:
2005
Abstract/Description:
Fluorochromes such as tetracycline have been used to label bone for histomorphometric analysis, measuring bone formation, growth, maintenance, and pathology. More recently, similar fluorescence has been observed in ancient human bone. Attributed to tetracycline (TC) exposure, this phenomenon could affect various aspects of health during life and/or preservation of remains postmortem. Standard epifluorescence microscopy is the most common tool employed in the analysis of these labels. Though valuable, this technique is limited by its inability to penetrate bone three-dimensionally and its inclusion of out-of-focus light, possibly disrupting accurate analysis. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) has been demonstrated as a valuable tool for three-dimensional histology. Its application to the study of compact bone fluorescence has been lacking, especially in archaeological and forensic sciences. In the following two papers, modern TC-controlled bone is compared to well preserved archaeological bone recovered from the Dakhleh Oasis, Egypt, using both standard wide-field and more modern confocal techniques for imaging and analysis. Spectral analysis via CLSM shows that both modern and ancient fluorescent labels in bone share the exact same fluorescence emission peak at 525 nm. Differences in the shape of the spectral curve and photobleaching characteristics are discussed. In addition, CLSM's high-resolution two- and three-dimensional imaging capabilities (in polarized light, scattered light, and fluorescence light) are found to increase the flexibility and creativity of investigations into the occurrence of tetracycline labels in archaeological bone and could have added benefits for modern medical and anatomical experimentation.
Title: CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY AS A TOOL FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF TETRACYCLINE FLUORESCENCE IN ARCHAEOLOGICALHUMAN BONE.
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Name(s): Maggiano, Corey, Author
Waterman, Jane , Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2005
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Fluorochromes such as tetracycline have been used to label bone for histomorphometric analysis, measuring bone formation, growth, maintenance, and pathology. More recently, similar fluorescence has been observed in ancient human bone. Attributed to tetracycline (TC) exposure, this phenomenon could affect various aspects of health during life and/or preservation of remains postmortem. Standard epifluorescence microscopy is the most common tool employed in the analysis of these labels. Though valuable, this technique is limited by its inability to penetrate bone three-dimensionally and its inclusion of out-of-focus light, possibly disrupting accurate analysis. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) has been demonstrated as a valuable tool for three-dimensional histology. Its application to the study of compact bone fluorescence has been lacking, especially in archaeological and forensic sciences. In the following two papers, modern TC-controlled bone is compared to well preserved archaeological bone recovered from the Dakhleh Oasis, Egypt, using both standard wide-field and more modern confocal techniques for imaging and analysis. Spectral analysis via CLSM shows that both modern and ancient fluorescent labels in bone share the exact same fluorescence emission peak at 525 nm. Differences in the shape of the spectral curve and photobleaching characteristics are discussed. In addition, CLSM's high-resolution two- and three-dimensional imaging capabilities (in polarized light, scattered light, and fluorescence light) are found to increase the flexibility and creativity of investigations into the occurrence of tetracycline labels in archaeological bone and could have added benefits for modern medical and anatomical experimentation.
Identifier: CFE0000836 (IID), ucf:46680 (fedora)
Note(s): 2005-12-01
M.S.
Arts and Sciences, Department of Biology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): bone
microscopy
archaeology
fluorescence
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000836
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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